A Ministry of Meetings
Stan Larson, editor

Chapter 5.

Diary Fourteen
18 April – 26 December
1901

Preaching to the World: “An Atlas was Secured”

[p. 273] [Thursday, 18 April, 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. J. F. Smith, and Apostles B. Young, Jr., F. M. Lyman,  J. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, M. W. Merrill, A. H. Lund, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, and Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “God Moves in a Mysterious [Way].” Apostle Teasdale was mouth in prayer, and F. M. Lyman in the circle.

Quarterly conference appointments: Weber, Geo. Teasdale, R. Clawson, and A. O. Woodruff; Juab, A. H. Lund and M. F. Cowley; Tooele, F. M. Lyman and H. J. Grant. I called attention to the fact that arrangements had been made to consummate the division of the Cache Stake on the 28th of April, and it would, therefore, be necessary to determine the names of the new stakes. It was decided to call the north stake, the Benson Stake, the center stake, the Cache stake, and the south stake, the Hyrum stake, in honor of the Patriarch Hyrum Smith. Some of the brethren rather favored the name of Logan for the center stake, and it was consequently decided to let the people indicate their choice as between Cache and Logan. It was further decided that the headquarters of the Benson Stake should be at Richmond.

Song, “Doxology.” Benediction by Apostle M. F. Merrill.

[Wednesday, 24 April 1901] [p. 274] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 7 a.m. Went to the Oregon Short Line Station to say good-bye to Apostle F. M. Lyman, who leaves to take charge of the European Mission. He also takes his wife with him. Members of his family and others were there to see him off.

I spent a portion of the day on the roller mill books. At 5 p.m. attended a meeting of the general board of the Y.M.M.I.A.

Our little Marion still continues very sick with heavy fever, which has had about 5 weeks run up to the present time. We feel, however, that he is mending a little.

[Thursday, 25 April 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents Lorenzo Snow and Jos. F. Smith, and Apostles B. Young, Jr., Jno. Henry Smith, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, J. W. Taylor, A. H. Lund, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah.” Apostle J. H. Smith was mouth in prayer, and Reed Smoot in the circle. Song, “O Ye Mountains High.”

Stake conference appointments: Cache, B. Young, M. W. Merrill, M. F. Cowley, and myself; Bannock, J. W. Taylor; Alpine,  J. H. Smith; Fremont, A. H. Lund. Apostle Grant and myself made our report as to the advisability of dividing the Salt Lake Stake, giving data showing that it would be a wise and proper move, and we recommended that it be done. In support of the position taken by us, we submitted a letter from Frank Y. Taylor, president of the Granite Stake, in which he pointed out the growth, improvement, and progress made by the people of that section of country, since they were separated from the Salt Lake Stake. We represented that the present Salt Lake Stake comprises some 30 wards and a population of about 24,000 souls. We felt that no single presidency could do justice to so large and populous a stake. Pres. Snow seemed to be quite pleased with the report and suggested that, as it was a matter of great importance, action be deferred for the present.

Permission was given to Apostle H. J. Grant to get up a concert in the tabernacle, June 1st, for the benefit of the Japan Mission. Apostles B. Young, Jr., J. W. Taylor, and Reed Smoot reported [p.275] their visit to and the reorganization of the Summit Stake, with Brother Moses Taylor as president. Benediction by Apostle A. H. Lund.

[Sunday, 28 April 1901] Salt Lake [City]. Clear and cool. Our little baby [Marion] is still quite sick and spent a restless night.

7 a.m. Left by train for Logan to attend the Cache Stake Conference and to assist in effecting a division of the stake, arriving at 10:40 a.m. Apostle A. O. Woodruff was on the train, and we were met by Jos. Morrell and were driven to the high council chamber in the tithing office building.

Meeting of some of the apostles. Present: B. Young, Jr., M. W. Merrill, M. F. Cowley, A. O. Woodruff, and myself. The plan of our procedure was discussed. The following motions prevailed: that the Cache Stake be reorganized today; that the Hyrum Stake be organized Tuesday with Apostle M. W. Merrill and A. O. Woodruff to attend to the matter; that the Benson Stake be organized on Tuesday with Apostles B. Young, Jr., and M. F. Cowley to effect the same; that Apostle Clawson be excused to return home on Monday on account of sickness in his family. The Cache Stake comprises some 11 wards with a population of 6610 souls; the Hyrum Stake, 8 wards with 4977 souls; and Benson, with 5643 souls.

2 p.m. Afternoon session of the conference in the Logan tabernacle, Apostle and Pres. M. W. Merrill presiding. M. W. M[errill]. Reported the condition of the stake as being fairly good. The B. Y. Monument fund indebtedness paid off; as also tabernacle debt and other obligations. The tithing of 1901 was 20% more than that of 1900. Ward conferences had been held in all the wards but one. Record day established in the stake. Marriage. Sugar beet raising; saints should take hold of this matter. Apostle M. W. Merrill presented his resignation as president of Cache Stake in accordance with the mind of the Pres[idency] and Twelve. Apostle B. Young put the question and the resignation was accepted.

Apostle B. Young made some remarks in reference to the division of the stake and had Apostle Woodruff read the names of the new stakes, giving the wards and population of each. He then presented the following names as the presidency of the Cache Stake: Jos. Morrell, president, Isaac Smith, 1st counselor, Willard [p.276] W. Maughn, 2nd counselor. Sustained by unanimous vote. Spoke of his visit to Cache valley 46 years ago, when he found this part of Utah unsettled. Its growth since that time. Politics. Priesthood defined.

7:30 p.m. On my way to [M.I.A.] meeting, I was notified that someone was calling for me at Salt Lake. Upon reaching the tele[phone] I learned from my sister, Tessie, that Marion was no better than when I left but much worse and that I had better take first train for home—namely, the midnight train.

12 midnight. I took the train for Salt Lake, arriving at 9:30 a.m. Monday morning. I was most sincerely grieved to learn that Marion had died at the hour I left Logan—namely, midnight. He was 8 months and 18 days old and was a bright and beautiful boy. Though young, it can be said of him that he had a sweet and lovable disposition.

[Monday, 29 April 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. I made all the arrangements for the funeral, which will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, at 2 p.m. In the afternoon Lydia and myself went to the graveyard and selected a burial lot. It is beautifully located and cost $75.00.

Tuesday, 30 April 1901

Salt Lake City. Clear and mild; ideal day. Our little Marion when dressed and placed in the casket for burial looked lifelike and beautiful, not as one dead, but one that sleepeth.

2 p.m. Funeral service at our home, Bp. O. F. Whitney presiding. Pres. Lorenzo Snow and Bp. O. F. Whitney made consoling remarks. The floral offerings from relatives and friends were chaste and beautiful. My brothers, Bradley, Stanley, Sidney, and Fred, acted as pallbearers. Some eight carriages followed to the grave, which was dedicated by Bp. Whitney. Marion was a great favorite in our home and will be sadly missed by all.

[Thursday, 2 May 1901] Salt Lake City. Raining and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents L. Snow and Jos. F. Smith, and Apostles B. Young, J. H. Smith, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, M. F. Cowley, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and  Geo. F. Gibbs, [p.277] clerk. Song, “Praise to the Man Who Communed with Jehovah.” Apostle M. F. Cowley was mouth in prayer, and A. H. Lund in the circle.

Quarterly conference appointments: Jordan, J. H. Smith; Woodruff, A. O. Woodruff; Summit, B. Young, Reed Smoot, and  J. W. Taylor. I was given permission to attend the monthly priesthood meeting of the Box Elder Stake on Saturday next, for the purpose of talking up the law of tithing.

Pres. Snow made some remarks upon the subject of tithing and among other things said: about the first physical duty a man has to perform in this church is to be baptized, and without baptism he cannot have entrance into the church. It would be foolish to teach the mysteries of the gospel to a convert, before he is instructed in regard to baptism. So with tithing, the only way we can become established upon the land of Zion and sanctify it and make it secure to ourselves, is by the payment of tithes—otherwise our possession of the land is uncertain. It is a great law and should be taught to the saints. It was the sense of the council that no member of the presidency of a stake, or high councillor, or member of a bishopric can be sustained in those positions, who are not tithe-payers.

Upon my suggestion Apostle A. H. Lund was appointed a member of the committee on church records to succeed Apostle F. M. Lyman, absent. Apostle B. Young reported the division of the Cache Stake as accomplished last Sunday and Tuesday, with Jos. Morrell as president of Cache Stake, Wm. H. Lewis as president of the Benson Stake, and Wm. C. Parkinson, president of the Hyrum Stake.

Song. Benediction by Apostle H. J. Grant.

[Friday, 3 May 1901] Salt Lake City. Raining, with heavy storm during night. I worked on the Utah Coal Co. books with a view to final closing, as the business has been sold to a man by the name of A. L. Williams. I worked out the following estimate, showing when the Church indebtedness would be entirely liquidated:

Church indebtedness $1,230,000.00
Average yearly revenue of the church in excess of [p.278] expense in conducting its affairs $ 600,000.00
Conservative amount to be set aside from the church revenues
to apply on indebtedness, as follows, to wit:
Amount now in reserve 50,000.00
1901 300,000.00
1902 300,000.00
1903 300,000.00
1904 300,000.00
                        $1,250,000.00

It will be seen that if the church has a margin of $600,000.00 over and above expenses to use for general purposes, the application of $300,000.00 a year to church indebtedness is a conservative estimate. I, therefore, assured President Snow that, if he should live until the close of 1904, he would see the church free from every obligation. He was very much gratified with the statement and remarked that, if he were living at that time and the church were free from the bondage of debt, there would most assuredly be a big jubilation in the temple.

It has been raining hard all day, greatly to the satisfaction of all who are engaged upon the farm and garden. Lydia has been suffering much pain of late from the lump in her breast caused by a cold and a kick by one of the children. We called in Dr. [Charles F.] Wilcox during the day, and he gave it as his opinion that the swelling would gather and break and thus bring relief. We hope so, as all fear of cancer will then be removed.

[Saturday, 4 May 1901] Salt Lake City. Raining, with storm during night. 7 [a.m.] Left for Brigham City to attend monthly priesthood meeting of the Box Elder Stake to lay the matter of tithing before the leading authorities of the stake.

11 a.m. Priesthood meeting in the 1st Ward hall, Pres. Chas. Kelly presiding. I occupied the time a[nd] dwelt upon the law of tithing and endeavored to impress upon the minds of the brethren the fact that the land of Zion could not be sanctified, except by the observance of this law.

[p. 279] At the close of the meeting I met with the presidency of the stake and bishopric of the wards. I placed the responsibility of looking after the non-tithe-payers upon the bishopric and distributed blanks to them for reports. There are 239 non-tithe-payers in the Box Elder Stake, 169 of whom bear the priesthood. It will be seen, therefore, that this is a matter of importance.

[Thursday, 23 May 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 9 a.m. Called in for a sitting with Mr. [George H.] Taggart, the artist who is painting my picture.

11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. L. Snow and Pres.  J. F. Smith, and Apostles Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “If We Could Fly [Hie] to Kolob.” Prayer by myself. Song, “O Ye Mountains High.”

Stake conference appointments: Box Elder, R. Clawson; Millard, Geo. Teasdale. Apostle H. J. Grant reported his recent visit to the Nebo Stake.

Pres. Snow stated that the writing of the church history had been placed in charge of Pres. Geo. Q. Cannon, but now that he was gone, it would be necessary to make other arrangements. After some discussion it was decided by unanimous vote that Brother B. H. Roberts be employed to do the work under the direction, advice, and assistance of Apostle A. H. Lund, church historian. Benediction by Apostle Reed Smoot.

[Thursday, 30 May 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 7 a.m. Accompanied by Lydia and two of the children, Samuel and Lorenzo, I left for Brigham City for a short visit and also to be present at the exercises to be given in the observance of Decoration Day. We arrived at 9 a.m. and were driven to Sister Jno. Anderson’s. At 11 a.m. we went to the cemetery where we have two children buried, namely, Daniel Spencer and Vera Mary, and decorated their graves. A great many people visited the graveyard during the forenoon, and while the hours were passing, the band played appropriate music. Towards evening we made several calls, and later by invitation of Sister Anderson a number of our friends called and passed the evening with us. An excellent supper was served.

[p. 280] [Saturday, 1 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. Today is the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Pres. Brigham Young. At 8 a.m. 100 guns were fired, and later his monument at the head of Main Street was decorated with flowers by the Sunday School children of the city. Many business houses were also decorated. Thousands of people went to Saltair in the afternoon, Lydia and myself among the number, where an interesting program was rendered, consisting of songs, speeches, and instrumental music. The speakers were Gov. Heber M. Wells, Dr. Jas. E. Talmage, Apostle Heber J. Grant, and Judge Robt. N. Baskin. The latter was formerly a bitter enemy of the Latter-day Saints, but upon this occasion was loud in his praises of Brigham Young. I am reminded of the following couplet:

“Round and round we run,
And ever the truth comes uppermost
And ever is justice done.”

[Sunday, 2 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. 10 a.m. Sixth general conference of the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Associations, Pres. Lorenzo Snow presiding. The meeting was held in the tabernacle.

Address, Pres. L. Snow. Topics treated. L. S[now]. Grand opportunities for good furnished by the M[utual] I[mprovement] Associations to the young people. The youth of Zion privileged through faithfulness to live to a great age. Evil of selfishness. Responsibility of motherhood. The glory attendant upon the exaltation of man and woman cannot be expressed [in] mortal language.

[Thursday, 6 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. J. F. Smith, B. Young, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, M. F. Cowley, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “This Earth Was Once a Garden Spot” and also “Praise to the Man.” Apostle B. Young was mouth in prayer, and Geo. Teasdale in the circle. Song, “Give Me Back My Prophet Dear.”

Conference appointments: Oneida, Geo. Teasdale; Pocatello, R. Clawson; Oregon Stake to organize, M. F. Cowley and A. O. [p.281] Woodruff; A. H. Lund to visit Teton Basin; North San Pete, Reed Smoot. Apostle A. O. Woodruff reported the organization of the Big Horn Stake with Byron Sessions as president, and Jesse W. Crosby and Elder [Charles A.] Welsch as counselors.

Reed Smoot reported his visit to Summit and reported the reorganization of all the ward bishoprics in that stake except Upton and Park City. Also stated that Brother W. W. Cluff, former president, and Alma Eldredge, former counselor to W. W. C[luff]., had been using an influence against his successor in office, Brother Moses Taylor, which had somewhat divided the people, but matters were now steadily improving. The attitude of Brother Cluff when he said that the changes effected in the Summit Stake were not inspired of the Lord, and his efforts to defeat the action of the First Presidency and Twelve by trying to influence the saints not to vote for Moses Tylor, only confirmed the brethren in the view that the change was not only necessary, but imperative. Benediction by Apostle B. Young.

[Wednesday, 12 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. 9:50 a.m. Accompanied by Lydia and mother, I left by train for Ogden to attend a reunion of the leading authorities of the Weber Stake of Zion, arriving at 11 a.m. We were driven to the 5th Ward meeting house. Present on the stand: Presidents Lorenzo Snow and J. F. Smith, Apostles Geo. Teasdale, A. H. Lund, and myself, Patriarch Jno. Smith, and the presidency of the stake, Pres. [Lewis W.] Shurtliff presiding.

Program
Address of welcome, Pres. Shurtliff. Response, Pres. L. Snow. Topics treated. L. S[now]. Expressed pleasure in being present. Spoke of visiting Ogden in the year 1849, and upon inquiry ascertained that there were only 5 (4 brethren and 1 sister) in the congregation who were here at that time. Addressing the audience he said, “Where will you be in 50 years hence?” Many of you will be in Jackson County and at that time, if not before, you will be looking for Jesus to come for he will be very near. Trials will come to you, but for every trial, every sacrifice, every suffering you will receive four-fold in reward. No man can receive a fullness of glory unless he has suffered a portion of bitterness. Said that Patriarch Joseph Smith [Sr.] in blessing him many years ago made use of this [p. 282]expression: “You shall be great, just as great as you want to be, as great as God himself, and you will not wish to be any greater than that.” This truth was revealed to him later by the Spirit of the Lord, namely, that “as man now is God once was, as God now is man may be.” [President Snow] Testified to having received the Holy Ghost at the time of his conversion. It came as the rustling of silken garments and rested upon him and filled his whole being. Through the Holy Ghost he received a knowledge of the Father in Heaven and of Jesus, His son, and also that the Father and Son had spoken to Joseph Smith, the prophet. Admonished those present to live that they might be privileged to receive their second anointings. Quoted the saying of Paul, the apostle: “Let that same mind be in you as was in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God” [cf. Philippians 2:5-6]. Urged the saints before him to strive to become like God. Referred to his incarceration in the Utah penitentiary for 11 months.

1 p.m. Banquet in the amusement hall adjoining the meeting house. There were three long tables loaded with the bounties of nature in great variety. Blessing was pronounced by Patriarch Jno. Smith. About 250 people were seated at the table, and, while eating, sweet music was discoursed by the orchestra, and a young lady sang, “Hard Times Come Again No More,” with accompaniment by all present.

At the close of the meal I was called upon to give an after-dinner speech. I referred to those present as watchmen upon the towers of Zion and said, “Great is your responsibility, great will be your anxiety, great will be your labors, great will be your trials, but great also will be your reward.” I referred to the imprisonment of President Snow in the “Pen” for conscience sake and related an incident that occurred while he was there, namely, the giving of the sacred shout by the brethren, led by President Snow, that which was probably never done in a prison before and which may never be done again. In conclusion, taking up a cup of warm water diluted with milk, I drank to the health, prosperity, and success of President L. W. Shurtliff, his counselors, the high council, the bishopric[s] of the wards, and all the authorities of the Weber Stake present.

At this juncture Pres. Snow arose and said that he felt that it would be appropriate and acceptable to the Lord to give the sacred [p.283] shout upon this occasion, whereupon all arose, and led by Pres. Snow, raised their voices in a mighty shout of Hosanna to God and the Lamb. Apostle A. H. Lund followed with brief remarks.

[Thursday, 13 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool; heavy rain storm during night. 11 a.m. Meeting of the brethren at the President’s office instead of the temple. Present: Presidents Lorenzo Snow and Jos. F. Smith, and Apostles Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, M. W. Merrill, A. H. Lund, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “Glory to God on High.” Prayer by Pres. L. Snow. Song, “O Say, What Is Truth?”

Quarterly conference appointments: St. George Stake, A. O. Woodruff and M. F. Cowley; Morgan, A. H. Lund; Salt Lake Stake, R. Clawson and Pres. J. F. Smith. Apostle Reed Smoot reported that the American Fork Ward was in a deplorable condition, spiritually, because of neglect and incapacity of the present bishop [William D. Robinson]. Upon motion of myself, it was decided to reorganize the bishopric of said ward.

I reported my visit last Sunday and Monday to Pocatello, and while in attendance at the conference there, I set apart Noah S. Pond as 1st counselor to Pres. W. A. Hyde, Henry S. Woodland as 2nd counselor, N. P. Neilsen and Chas. W. Hill as high councillors, and ordained Wilford Bennion as Bishop of Neeleyville. Before taking my seat, I referred to the matter of non-tithe-payers and felt that some action should be taken relative to those who bear the priesthood, as by experience I had been led to believe that those who rejected the law of tithing, or failed to honor it, were indifferent, generally, to their duties in the church. The question was pretty fully discussed, and though no formal action was taken, it seemed to be the mind of the brethren that while it would be unwise and injudicious at present to relieve men of their priesthood, who failed to observe the law of tithing, it would certainly be proper to call for the resignation of non-tithe-payers, who were officiating in various prominent positions in the church.

Apostle H. J. Grant was appointed to dedicate the new meeting house, Wilford Ward, Granite Stake. Apostle Lund reported the organization of the Driggs Ward, Teton Basin, under his direction, with Don C. Driggs as bishop.

[p. 284] In answer to a question by Apostle Brigham Young, it was decided by unanimous vote upon motion of Pres. J. F. Smith, that men who were called to the high council should be ordained high priests and set apart as high councillors.

In order to establish uniform procedure throughout the church relative to the manner of blessing the bread and wine in the administration of the sacrament, it was decided that one, and one only—the party officiating—should kneel. Benediction by Apostle B. Young.

[Sunday, 16 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 10 a.m. Continuation of [Salt Lake Stake] Conference, Pres. A. M. Cannon presiding. H. J. G[rant]. The providences of God. Read the hymn entitled “Come, Come, Ye Saints” and commented thereon. Read a prophecy of Joseph Smith declaring that the saints would move to the Rocky Mountains and become a mighty people there. The trials endured by our parents and the influence exerted by parents after death on their children. The conversion of his brother Brigham, by the influence of his father [Jedediah M. Grant], long since deceased.

[Thursday, 20 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and warm. 10 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents L. Snow and J. F. Smith, and Apostles B. Young, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, M. F. Cowley, J. W. Taylor, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Apostle A. O. Woodruff was mouth in prayer, and M. F. Cowley in the circle. Song, “Zion Stands with Hills Surrounded.”

Quarterly conference appointments: Malad, R. Clawson; Bear Lake, Geo. Teasdale; Davis, H. J. Grant and J. W. Taylor. The clerk read a letter from Pres. Wm. Budge of Bear Lake Stake, in which he recommended Wilford W. Richards for bishop of Georgetown to succeed the present bishop, resigned, and Saml. Hymas as bishop of Sharon, a new ward. The recommendations were adopted by full vote.

A letter from the presidency of the Utah Stake, enclosing a letter from Bp. [Thomas J.] Parmley of Pleasant Valley Ward, was read. The recommendation was made that Scofield be organized [p.285] into a ward with Jno. E. Ingles as bishop. Adopted and Apostle Reed Smoot [was] instructed to attend to the matter.

Pres. H. S. Gowans of the Tooele Stake recommended that Brother Francis D. St. Joer, late bishop of Clover, be ordained a patriarch, and that Elder Mahonri M. Stookey be ordained bishop of Clover, he having been sustained in that position. Adopted.

An interesting letter from Apostle F. M. Lyman, pres. of the European Mission, was read by the clerk. Apostle A. O. Woodruff reported his visit to St. George and the reorganization of the stake presidency with Ed. Snow as president, and Thos. P. Cottam, 2nd counselor, and that five of the more aged brethren of the high council [were] honorably released and younger men called to succeed them. He recommended the late Pres. [Daniel D.] McArthur for ordination to the office of patriarch.

Pres. Snow said that a question [of] importance relative to educational matters was being agitated and doubtless would soon be discussed by the church board of education, namely, as to whether we should sustain the University of Utah in its work as a university or introduce work in that line into our church schools. In the days of President Woodruff it was thought proper to sustain the University of Utah and confine our church schools to academy work. Our schools certainly could not enlarge their sphere of action without more help from the church financially, than they have been receiving during the past three or four years, and that help cannot be furnished by the church for at least four years when it is hoped and confidently expected that the church will be free from debt. He felt that this is a serious question.

I was appointed by unanimous vote to take charge of the prayer circle presided over by the late Patriarch Alonzo Raleigh.1 Benediction by Apostle B. Young.

5 p.m. Reception at Pres. Jos. F. Smith’s for Apostle H. J. Grant and fellow missionaries to Japan. Present: President Lorenzo Snow, Pres. J. F. Smith, and Apostles B. Young, M. F. Cowley, A. O. Woodruff, A. H. Lund, myself, and wives, the missionaries to Japan, namely, Apostle H. J. Grant, L. A. Kelsch, H. S. Ensign, A.  [p.286] O. Taylor, and wives, Patriarch Jno. Smith, Pres. L. W. Shurtliff of Weber Stake, Jno. McDonald, Jno. J. McClellan, tabernacle organist, and wives, and others.

The following very interesting program was carried out: Remarks, Pres. L. Snow. Topics treated. L. S[now]. Felt in his heart to thank Pres. Smith for the privilege of being in the midst of this company with such a lovely spirit. Brethren and sisters, he said, you are my brethren and sisters in the fullest sense of the word. We lived together in the other life. We should love one another and live together in love. The brethren going to Japan will be greatly and abundantly blessed. The Lord will be with them. God bless and prosper you on your journey; and may you be relieved of persecution such as has attended other missionaries. How grand and lovely is the singing and music in the other world, although I can’t imagine that it could be much better than it is in this world. God bless these missionaries, and He will bless them.

Response, Pres. J. F. Smith. Topics treated. J. F. S[mith]. Said he was thankful for the presence of Pres. Snow and the brethren and sisters. We are assembled in the room where our daily prayers are offered up unto the Lord, and in those prayers Pres. Snow, he said, was always remembered. Pointed to a bookcase in the room and remarked that it belonged to his mother in Nauvoo. In this case the penny fund, used to purchase glass for the Nauvoo Temple, was kept.

Pres. Snow again spoke briefly and said that in his family prayers Pres. Smith’s name was always mentioned. Pres. Snow arose and said, I desire to bear my testimony. I know that Jesus lives. Many of you who are here tonight will see him, you will see that he is a noble looking man, and you will feel like going to him and shaking hands. When you return to Jackson County and engage in building the temple there, you will see Jesus and be associated with him. I bear this testimony for I know it is true.

It may well be judged from the above program that we had an instructive and enjoyable evening. We were in the society of the blessed and the Spirit of God was abundantly manifested.

[Tuesday, 25 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 10 a.m. Meeting of the general church board of education, and Pres. Jas. Linford of the B. Y. [p.287] College, Logan, J. H. Paul of the Latter-day Saints College, Geo. H. Brimhall, acting pres. of the B. Y. Academy, Provo, Pres. Wm. H. Kerr of the Agricultural College, Logan, Jas. Sharp of the board of regents of the University of Utah, Professors Wm. Stewart and R[ichard] R. Lyman of the University of Utah, the Presiding Bishopric of the church, and others, Pres. Lorenzo Snow presiding. The object of the meeting was to discuss this question: “Shall the church schools be restricted in the future to high school work and turn their college students over to the University of Utah, or shall they continue the college work as heretofore.”

Pres. Snow said that the subject for discussion was a very important one, a matter that concerns the church of the Living God and also the world in which we live. We must take a broad view of the subject. There is a difference of opinion as to how far we should sacrifice the interests of the church schools and academies for the university, and yet the church has many times been called upon to make sacrifices for the good of the cause. The brethren were invited to express their views freely and without restraint. The whole day to 5 p.m. was devoted to the discussion, the only interruption coming in the shape of a lunch, which was served in the Beehive House.

It would be difficult in a few words to give a synopsis of what was said, and I shall, therefore, simply indicate the view that was taken by each speaker. The following brethren were in favor of restricting the church schools to high school work: James Sharp, L. F. Moench, W. M. Stewart, R. R. Lyman, Bp. Wm. B. Preston, S. B. Young, and R. T. Burton. The following were in favor of continuing college work in the church schools: Geo. H. Brimhall,  J. H. Paul, Jas. Linford, Wm. H. Kerr, J. M. Tanner, myself, A. H. Lund, and Brigham Young. There were quite a number of the brethren present who did not speak. No formal vote was taken but the brethren separated with tacit understanding that no change should take place in the church schools for the present at least. I believe a vote would have shown the sentiment of the meeting to have been in favor of college work in the church schools.

[Wednesday, 26 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 4 p.m. Reception to Apostle Heber J. Grant and fellow missionaries to Japan given by the [p.288] general board of the Y.M.M.I.A. in the spacious parlors of the Beehive House, President Snow, the general superintendent, presiding. Present: the general superintendency, most of the members of the board and their wives, Apostle Brigham Young, Pres. Seymour B. Young, Patriarch Jno. Smith, and their wives, the missionaries to Japan, namely, Apostle Heber J. Grant, Louis A. Kelsch, Horace S. Ensign, and Alma O. Taylor, and their wives (except in the case of Alma O. Taylor, who is unmarried), and other invited guests. It was a very choice company of brethren and sisters. Pres. J. F. Smith was absent in the east.

At this point [after songs and short speeches] Pres. Lorenzo Snow arose and made brief remarks, and said in substance: when the Lord first sent forth his elders in this generation very little was known as to what their labors would be and what they could accomplish. They failed in some respects, but they did not fail in one thing: they did their duty. Apostle Orson Pratt and others were sent to Austria to open a mission there, but by reason of the rejection of their testimony they did not succeed. Nevertheless, they did their duty and were blessed. Noah preached 120 years; he was a grand man; he did his duty but failed, and this because the people rejected him. However, by doing his duty he secured to himself exaltation and glory. Moses, in leading the children of Israel to the promised land, failed to accomplish what the Lord wanted by reason of the disobedience of the Israelites. Moses himself, through faithfulness, has attained to the Godhead. There is no doubt of this. As to these brethren who will shortly leave for Japan, the Lord has not revealed to me that they will succeed, but He has shown me that it is their duty to go. They need not worry concerning the results—only be careful to search the Spirit of the Lord to see what it indicates to them. Do not be governed by your own wisdom but rather by the wisdom of God. When you return, we will come together, perhaps as we are together today, and will rejoice in your faithfulness. God bless you, and may our Holy Father in heaven open the way before you, and may you succeed in converting many of the Japanese people.

Remarks, Apostle Brigham Young. Apostle Young said that the Spirit had borne witness to him that these brethren had been called of the Lord to take this mission to Japan and predicted that [p.289]the angel of the Lord would go before them and that they should be blessed in their labors.

Remarks, Apostle H. J. Grant. Apostle Grant said in part that he very much appreciated the honor conferred upon himself and companion missionaries by this reception of the general board of the Y.M.M.I.A. Felt humble and desirous of doing his duty. Some years ago—at a time when he was brought low, “near unto death,” upon a bed of sickness—he promised the Lord, he said, that in the event of his recovery and restoration to health that he might have an opportunity to pay off his personal indebtedness, which at that time was very great, he would be willing to journey to the ends of the earth and preach the gospel. The Lord had now brought him to the test. When Pres. Snow announced that he had been called to take a mission to Japan, it came, of course, as a great surprise, and he felt that, had he made a statement of his financial condition, the brethren of the First Presidency would have released him. He did not feel to do this, he said, but responded without hesitation or reservation that he accepted the call, feeling that the Lord was abundantly able to relieve him of every embarrassment. [Heber J. Grant] had now to relate that God in a marvelous way had blessed and prospered him to that degree that within the past few months he had been enabled to cancel $100,000.00 of his indebtedness and was at this moment practically free from financial embarrassment and distress. Rejoiced in this manifestation of God’s overruling providence and now desired to go forth and do his duty. He knew that his companions were selected by the Lord and was glad to be confirmed in this feeling by the remarks of the president of the Twelve Apostles. As to whether many of the Japanese would be converted to the truth through the labors of himself and companions or whether the Japanese nation would open their doors to the gospel, he could not say, but he felt to give assurance that he and his associates would do their duty.

[Thursday, 27 June 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. Lorenzo Snow and Apostles B. Young, J. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clk. Song, “Glory to God on High.” Apostle B. Young was mouth in prayer, and J. H. Smith [p.290] in the circle. Pres. L. Snow remarked that 57 years ago today Joseph Smith, the prophet, was martyred for the truth and suggested that “A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief” be sung, which was done.

The clerk read a letter from Elder Jno. G. McQuarrie, president of the Eastern States Mission, in which he recommended Jno. E. Baird for his 1st counselor, and Fred L. Cruikshank for his 2nd counselor, and also that Martha E. Cruikshank, wife of his counselor, be called to labor as a missionary in the Eastern States Mission. Recommendations approved.

Pres. Wm. H. Lewis of Benson called attention by letter to the fact that Lewiston Ward is now without a bishop by reason of his appointment to the presidency of the stake. He recommended that a reorganization be effected with Wm. Waddoups as bishop and suggested further that the headquarters of the stake be definitely fixed at an early date. Recommendations approved and Apostles B. Young and R. Clawson delegated to attend to the matter. In answer to a letter from the president [Orrin P. Miller] of the Jordan Stake, Apostle Reed Smoot was authorized to install a bishop in the Bingham Ward, Elder [William E.] Harding being recommended for the place.

I reported my attendance at a recent conference of the Salt Lake Stake, at which as usual the Saturday meetings were very lightly attended, there being as it were only a handful of people present. In view of this I took the liberty to suggest to the presidency of the stake that hereafter the Saturday meetings be dispensed with, and that three meetings, constituting the conference, be held on the Sunday. Pres. A.M. Cannon and counselors heartily concurred with the proposition and said that, if the Presidency of the church offered no objection, they would adopt it.

No particular objection was offered, but Pres. Snow remarked that, while as suggested many people in Salt Lake were tied up in business and could not attend Saturday meetings, yet there must be something wrong somewhere in some way or the attendance would be better than it is. One of the brethren remarked that it has always been so from the beginning and felt that the trouble was with the stake presidency.

Apostle H. J. Grant (with R. Clawson associated), representing [p.291] the committee appointed to investigate the propriety of dividing the Salt Lake Stake by Main Street, reported that a careful investigation of the recent division of said stake shows an improvement and decided advance in every direction—in tithe-paying, in renewed interest among all the local organizations of the wards, and in a greatly increased attendance at all meetings. The committee, therefore, strongly recommended that the stake be again divided. I also spoke to the report and said that it met with my hearty approval. Said that every argument heretofore used for the dividing of large stakes would apply in the present case. Had always taken the view that about 10,000 church population should be the limit of the larger stakes and that the Salt Lake [Stake] today has a membership of about 27,000.

Pres. Snow said that he did not know but that it would be a good idea to divide the stake, but, said he, “Have we suitable material for the new presidencies? Who would you suggest?” The brethren thought we would have no difficulty in finding strong men in the Salt Lake Stake for the presiding officers and mentioned a few names. Pres. Snow said that if the division were made it would be necessary—imperative—to exercise great care in the selection of presidents. The president of a stake is the responsible man, as in a ward the bishop is the responsible man. When we talk about the management of a ward, we speak of the bishop. When men who are not suitable are selected for presidents and bishops, a change may become necessary in the future and that brings humiliation. This should be avoided so far as possible.

I said that, if in order, I would move that the Salt Lake Stake be divided. Pres. Snow suggested that, in the absence of Pres. Jos. F. Smith, action be postponed for the present.

Apostle Reed Smoot reported the reorganization of the Upton Ward, Summit Stake, with Jno. Saxton as bishop and J. H. Judd and C. Stapley as counselors; and the organization of Grass Creek, a new ward, Summit Stake, with Jno. F. Salmon, bishop, and J. W. Wilde and Jno. Pendleton, counselors. It was decided to recall Hans O. Young, bishop of Parley’s Park, who has been absent on a mission twenty months, that he might again take charge of his ward.

Apostle Reed Smoot also reported that Bishop [William D.] Robinson of American Fork, who had been asked to resign, [p.292] declined to do so. He recommended that American Fork be divided into four wards. This he felt to be a necessary move, and it would also open the way for a reorganization of the bishopric. Recommendation [was] adopted and Apostle Smoot instructed to attend to the matter.

Hymn, “Give Me Back My Prophet Dear.” Benediction by Apostle Reed Smoot.

[Monday, 1 July 1901] Lewiston. Clear and cool. I will say this in regard to my visit to Lewiston, that while there Pres. [William H.] Lewis was very anxious for Apostle M. W. Merrill and myself to locate the headquarters of the Benson Stake, both Lewiston and Richmond having been talked of. I told him we could not very well do so, as Apostle Brigham Young, who was appointed with myself to confer with Apostle Merrill upon this subject, remained at home on account of sickness. As for myself I favor Lewiston. Apostle Merrill (who is a resident of Richmond) favors Richmond. I told Pres. Lewis that I would refer the matter to Pres. Snow.

[Wednesday, 3 July 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and warm. The following is copy of a letter sent to Pres. Wm. H. Lewis of Benson Stake:

Salt Lake City,
July 3rd, 1901

Pres. Wm. H. Lewis
Lewiston, Utah

My dear brother:

Agreeable to promise I write you a line. Pres. Snow expressed his appreciation of the picture of the new meeting house and thought it very fine. Pres. Smith is away from home at present.

In regard to the headquarters of the Benson Stake, would say that Apostle Brigham Young has been authorized and instructed to attend to the matter, and he directed me to say that he will be up at the earliest possible moment (it may be  sometime this week, though not absolutely certain) but without doubt in a very short [p.293] time, and he will telegraph you when and where to meet him. The question will be decided and adjusted solely upon its merits.

With kind regards and best wishes and a pleasant remembrance of my visit to your ward, I remain,

Your brother,
[signed] Rudger Clawson

I might here observe that the headquarters of the Benson Stake will undoubtedly be located at Lewiston, this being the mind of Pres. Snow and the brethren.

[Sunday, 7 July 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and hot. 10 a.m. Fast meeting at the temple, Pres. Snow presiding.

Pres. Lorenzo Snow. Topics treated. When we get to heaven we will ask ourselves, how has it been with us while on earth? Are we better today, are we stronger today, than we were a month ago? Where we have been at fault, we should endeavor to correct the same in the future. It is a great pleasure to be a Latter-day Saint. We should feel happy and satisfied. When he was in the “Pen,” he said, he was made cheerful and happy by trying to make others happy.

Pres. Snow said in part: one of the most difficult improvements the Latter-day Saints have to make is in relation to a monetary consideration. “Property we haven’t got, we are striving improperly to get, and property we have, we are striving improperly to keep.” Said that there have been rich men among us in times past who haven’t paid one third of their tithing, and others who have paid none at all, but it is getting to be different now. There is a brother in Provo who sent in the other day $27,000 for tithing, and this same brother has given by donation to the church as high as $10,000. There is a sister in this meeting, who has contributed to the church for educational purposes something like $23,000. And such things may be said of the man at my right (Apostle H. J. Grant) and of the man at my left (Bp. J. R. Winder). There is a great improvement among the Latter-day Saints in tithe-paying, and I rejoice in it.

[p. 294] [Tuesday, 9 July 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and warm. 10 a.m. I attended a meeting of the board of directors of the Utah Light and Power Co.

11 a.m. Quarterly conference of the Twelve. I came in late on account of the other meeting. Present: B. Young, Geo. Teasdale, H. J. Grant, A. H. Lund, A. O. Woodruff, R. Clawson, and Reed Smoot.

Some discussion was indulged in regarding Saltair, with reference particularly to the selling of beer at that resort. It was moved and carried that it be the sense of the meeting that the brethren of the Twelve are opposed to the selling of beer at Saltair.

Apostle Reed Smoot moved that it shall become the duty of the Twelve to instruct the presidents of stakes, and through them the bishops of wards, to interrogate young people who go to the temple to get married and ascertain, if possible, whether in any case they have committed themselves, and in such event to deny them the privilege of going into [the] house of the Lord. Carried. Benediction by Apostle H. J. Grant.

In the afternoon accompanied by Lydia, I went to the lake, it being Relief Society day. A short program was given consisting of prayer by Apostle B. Young, music by the band, address by Pres. Lorenzo Snow, music, benediction by myself. We went in bathing and afterwards sat down to a nice lunch prepared by the Relief Society officers. In the evening we attended a reception, given by Bp. Millen Atwood of the Sugar House Ward, to the Japanese missionaries.

[Wednesday, 10 July 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and hot. 10 a.m. Continuation of the quarterly conference of the Twelve. Present: Apostles Brigham Young, John H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Heber J. Grant, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot. Song, “O My Father.” Prayer by Rudger Clawson. Song, “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah.”

Apostle Reed Smoot was the first speaker. Topics treated. Reported that the reorganization of the Summit Stake was now complete with the exception of two wards. Conditions in that stake have been very bad. Almost a total disregard of the word of wisdom. [p.295] There is a tendency among the young people of that stake, also the Utah Stake, and perhaps with other stakes, to commit themselves before marriage, and this is a matter, he felt, that should have the special attention of the Twelve. Had also noticed a tendency among our people to go in debt, notwithstanding the experience of recent years. Was pleased with the great improvement in tithe-paying; regretted to learn that there were some brethren in the church who excused themselves from the observance of this law because they had sons in the missionary field to support.

I followed and said in part that I had just received a letter from Apostle Francis M. Lyman in which he advised that myself and other brethren should sign our given names in full, and also in referring to others, should give their names in full. I mentioned this matter, I said, because in my judgment it was an excellent and appropriate suggestion. Said that I had greatly enjoyed my labors during the past three months and in visiting the stakes usually called the presidency, high council, and bishopric[s] of wards together in order to promote good fellowship and acquaintance and lay before them any important items of instruction. Felt that great good comes from preaching the word, as witness the increase in tithes and offerings. Pointed out the necessity of selecting the best and strongest men for presiding positions—especially with reference to presidents of stakes; a good, strong, active, progressive president will be more likely to select strong men for associates than a weak president would do. At all events it seemed to me to be about the most important question we have to face in the strengthening of Zion.

Abraham O. Woodruff. Topics treated. Had been called to organize the Big Horn Stake and had also assisted in the organization of the Union Stake, Oregon, and the reorganization of the presidency of the St. George Stake. These labors he had enjoyed. A good deal of his time was taken up in the colonization of the Big Horn Stake, and he was now about to leave for that part of the country. Was not quite clear in his mind as to the status of those who (like Gov. [Heber M.] Wells) have been sealed in the temple and afterwards were married by the law of the land. He looked upon them, however, as covenant breakers. The work of God [was] first and foremost with him.

Matthias F. Cowley. Topics treated. Spoke of his recent visit [p.296] to Canada and said that we have ten wards in the Alberta Stake and are without a single L[atter] D[ay] Saint teacher in the district schools, which arises from the fact that our teachers cannot pass the technical examination to which they are subjected. Felt that it would be wisdom for the church to call missionaries to attend the Canadian institutions of learning and qualify themselves for teachers. Read a communication from Sterling Williams, endorsed by the presidency of the Alberta Stake, setting forth the importance of making such call, and which would be submitted to the Presidency of the church.

One of the greatest evils prevailing in Cardston today is whiskey drinking, and Apostle Jno. W. Taylor is making an effort to get prohibition laws for that district of country. Recommended that the elders be withdrawn from Butte and Anaconda, Montana, as there is a total lack of interest in the gospel and no spirit of investigation on the part of the people in those places.

Minutes read and approved. Benediction by Apostle Reed Smoot.

2 p.m. Continuation of conference. Song, “Come, All Ye Sons of God.” Prayer by Apostle Jno. H. Smith. Song, “Be It My Only Wisdom Here.”

Apostle Anthon H. Lund. Topics treated. Had enjoyed the meetings thus far. Felt some concern relative to Saltair; had hoped we would be able to say of that place, we have in the church a temperance resort. By reason of the present situation the mouths of the Twelve were practically closed in relation to some evils. Spoke of the advantages arising out of the church school system, that could not be enjoyed in gentile schools. The great feature of the church schools was theology, which in his estimation was of more importance by far than all other studies combined.

Spoke of the evil of marriage outside of the temple, in cases where the parties had been previously sealed over the altar. In referring to certain conditions that exist among us said that at times it seems that a wave of immorality sweeps over Zion. In a certain ward in San Pete Stake sometime ago, the bishop informed him that out of 12 marriages during a period of six months 7 were forced. Sufficient attention is not given to our young people in their amusements. Bishops should mingle with their young in the dance.

[p. 297] Apostle Marriner W. Merrill. Topics treated. Referred to the Logan Temple and said it was in need of quite extensive repairs. The expense had been apportioned to the stakes in that district under the approval of the First Presidency. Said he had come across several cases in the temple where young people had committed themselves. Personally he was opposed to the selling of liquor at Saltair and did not approve of marriages outside of the house of God, but had to get along with these things the best he could.

Apostle Heber J. Grant. Topics treated. Said he would leave for Japan reasonably free from financial anxiety. The obligations resting upon him would be carried by Zion’s Savings Bank. Spoke strongly against the selling of liquor at Saltair, and so long as it is done, felt, he said, that we were responsible in a great measure for the wave of immorality sweeping over Zion. Thought it a serious question. Spoke of the church schools and felt that they ought not to be curtailed in church appropriations. So long as the church schools are able to turn out such men as J. M. Tanner, Henry S. Tanner, and Stephen L. Chipman, son of an apostate, they should have our undivided support. Felt and suggested that upon the morrow before we break our fast, we should unite in praying for the restoration of Brother Francis M. Lyman, Jr. Adopted.

Apostle Geo. Teasdale. Topics treated. Felt aggrieved in his mind that we have to talk sometimes as we do. Pres. Snow is our file leader, and we do not always know the ins and outs of every question, or the motives that prompt him, but this we do know that as a quorum we were opposed to the selling of liquor at Saltair; but there is an evil practiced at Saltair almost if not as great as liquor, and that is the indiscriminate association of the sexes in bathing. Our business is to preach the gospel, and when we get people into the church, to keep them there. We must be united in all things.

An adjournment was taken until 10 a.m. tomorrow. Benediction by Apostle Brigham Young. He prayed that in forming our judgment in all matters relating to the interests of Zion, God would direct by his Spirit.

[Wednesday, 4 September 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. I spent the day mostly at the President’s office, working on my financial annual statement. At 5 p.m. attended a meeting of the general board of the Y.M.M.I.A. and later took the folks out for a ride.

[Thursday, 5 September 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. Meeting of the brethren at the President’s office. Present: Apostles Jno. W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot. Apostle Lund was mouth in prayer.

Appointments to stake conferences: North San Pete, Apostle Lund; Pocatello, Apostle Taylor; Salt Lake Stake, Apostle Clawson.

A letter from Geo. Cluff, Castle Gate, was read. He desired, he said, to plant a colony of young men in Guatemala, South [Central] America, between Lake Isabel and the Motagua River near the Gulf of Honduras. It is a tropical country with healthful climate; the lands, rich and fertile; the government of that country, favorable to settlers. He now sought counsel in the matter and awaited the decision of the prophet. Action deferred until Pres. Snow and Pres. Smith should be present; the former being at Saltair, and the latter in the Teton basin.

Apostle Taylor introduced for discussion the question of colonization and said that he felt that the present policy of discouraging emigration was a mistaken one. The spirit of gathering rests upon converts in the world, and he felt that they might be emigrated to such points as Canada, the Big Horn, the Teton, Idaho, Arizona, and possibly Mexico, with splendid results to themselves and the church. Another important consideration connected with [p.314] this matter, he said, was the fact that the children of converts in the world grow up in the midst of gentile influences, in many instances marry outside of the church, and in all cases outside of the temple, and drift away from the faith of their parents. It was suggested that if some capable brother were appointed to take charge of the colonization business for the church, acquaint himself with the conditions and opportunities in the stakes of Zion, and then post himself fully as to conditions in the missionary fields with reference to the number of converts who desire to emigrate and who are in need of homes, thus placing himself in a position to direct them where to go before leaving for Zion, that great good would result therefrom and the church be strengthened. Upon motion of Apostle Clawson, Apostle Taylor was instructed to bring this matter up at our next quarterly conference of the Twelve. Benediction by Apostle Woodruff.

[Sunday, 8 September 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 10 a.m. Salt Lake Stake Conference, held in assembly hall, Pres. A.M. Cannon presiding. Attendance fairly good—much better than at the first session for several years past. This was due in the main to the fact that the conferences had been changed from Saturday and Sunday to Sunday alone with three sessions.

I made brief remarks and expressed gratification at the improvement as shown by the attendance and was also pleased to learn that all the bishops of the stake were present but three, and that the three were absent from the city or they would doubtless have been present. Said that while our whole people were shocked by the fearful news that came over the wires within a day or so—namely, that Wm. McKinley, president of the United States, had been shot and severely wounded, and brought near unto death by the hand of an assassin—yet we were pleased to learn this morning that he has a strong chance for recovery. I invoked the blessing of God upon him and said that I believe in so doing I was expressing the universal sentiment of the Latter-day Saints. Dwelt strongly upon the subject of marriage; reading from Section 132 on the “Eternity of the Marriage Covenant,” pointed out the great responsibility resting upon parents and presiding officers of the church to teach the young people of our faith the importance of [p.315] being married for time and eternity in the temple, thus laying the foundation of their kingdoms firm and strong.

2 p.m. Continuation of conference at tabernacle, Pres. A. M. Cannon presiding. Pres. Lorenzo Snow followed and, referring to the attempted killing of Pres. McKinley, said he felt it to be the duty of the Latter-day Saints to pray for his recovery. Pres. McKinley, he said, had been called of the Lord to do the work assigned him. He will receive a great reward in the future life for that which he has accomplished in the interest of the nation. Sorrow, trouble, and affliction is absolutely necessary to those who receive a fullness of the Godhead.

[Monday, 16 September 1901] St. George. Clear and warm. I visited the St. George Temple and was shown through by Elder David H. Cannon, president. This visit was a matter of great interest to me, as this was the first temple erected and dedicated in the mountains. I went all through the building, and on to the tower from which point I obtained a grand view of the surrounding country, which was indeed beautiful. Since the temple was finished in 1877, there have been 577,299 ordinances performed for the living and the dead.

[Thursday, 19 September 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 10 a.m. Memorial services in the tabernacle, in honor of Wm. McKinley, the martyred president, whose funeral will take place today at Canton, Ohio, President Angus M. Cannon presiding. Attendance crowded—there must have been 10,000 people present. Bp. O. F. Whitney was the speaker, and his remarks were impressive and eloquent. He gave a brief sketch of the life and administration of Pres. McKinley and dwelt upon the resurrection. Funeral march by [Frederic] Chopin, rendered by Prof. J. J. McClellan on the great tabernacle organ.

[Monday, 23 September 1901] Farmington, Utah. Cloudy and cool. 10 a.m. Continuation of [Davis Stake] Conference, Pres. Jno. W. Hess presiding. I read Sec. 24, D.&C., and made remarks on the great importance of listening to the voice of the priesthood and giving heed thereto, otherwise the Lord would send a cursing instead of a blessing. The presiding [p.316] authorities of the stake should be just and impartial in their administration, not favoring one organization to the detriment of another.

2 p.m. Continuation of conference. I made remarks. Said that the character of a ward or organization is known by the character of the bishop or president, so great care should be taken in the selection of officers who preside. Power and authority of the priesthood. Marriage.

Pres. Jno. W. Hess made concluding remarks and spoke in great power. He blessed me by the power of the priesthood and said that the spirit of the apostleship rested upon me. He prophesied that I should become a mighty man in Israel. Testified that I was called by the Lord to the apostleship and that the spirit of it would rest upon me greatly and abundantly. Said that I should live long upon the earth. Thus ended a very interesting and profitable conference, and one from which it was hoped much good fruit would be borne.

[Thursday, 26 September 1901] 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents Lorenzo Snow and Jos. F. Smith, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Jno. W. Taylor, Anthon H. Lund, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Apostle Reed Smoot was mouth in prayer, and Apostle Woodruff in the circle. Song, “Lord, We Come before Thee Now.”

The clerk read a letter from Apostle Lyman, giving an interesting and spirited account of his recent visit to the Swiss, German, and Scandinavian Missions. The clerk also read a letter from Geo. Cluff relative to planting a colony of our people in Guatemala, South [Central] America, which letter was read at former meeting of the brethren, Pres. Snow being absent. Action deferred.

President Snow explained why he had allowed his daughter, Mabel, to act as queen of the Elks Carnival. The general idea was that we might, as a people, get influence with a large organization of influential men in the nation—and yet, he said, he did not feel to give them aid, or encouragement, or endorsement further than this. Spoke of Joseph, the prophet, and others of the brethren joining the Freemasons in order to obtain influence in furtherance of the purposes of the Lord.

[p. 317] Apostle Clawson reported his recent attendance at the St. George Stake Conference. Said that Elder Geo. F. Whitehead was sustained and set apart as 2nd counselor to Pres. Ed. H. Snow. Brother Clawson recommended the division of the St. George Stake as being almost imperative, owing to the long distances between wards. Thought that St. George Stake proper should be confined to Washington County—3000 souls, and the Nevada wards, to Nevada—1500 souls. Action deferred for the present, although the brethren conceded that the division should be made. Apostle Lund reported that he had ordained Elder J. Nielsen, bishop of Hyrum 3rd Ward.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith moved that Amos Wright of Bear Lake be appointed to a mission among the Shoshone Indians to visit and preach to them. Carried. He also reported the organization of the Teton Stake with Don Carlos Driggs as president, and J. D. Killpack and Geo. S. Young as counselors. Apostle Jno. H. Smith assisted him. Besides the meetings held in the Teton Basin where the organization took place, they held meetings also in Jackson Hole. Pres. Smith moved that Bingham, Teton, and Fremont Stakes be set apart to constitute a church school district. Carried. The same action was made to apply to the Emery and Carbon Stakes when organized, and also to the Utah, Alpine, and Nebo Stakes.

Apostle Taylor reported his attendance at the Parowan Stake Conference and said among other things that the Parowan Ward was spiritually dead. This was apparent, he said, when the bishop informed him that he had been unable to get a teacher to act in that responsible position for the past six years. It was moved and carried that with the first visit of an apostle to Parowan the bishopric be reorganized.

Stake President E. H. Snow recommended by letter the following brethren for the positions named: Wm. Abbott, bishop of Mesquite, and Jno. M. Bunker, bishop of Preston, Nevada. Carried.

Apostle Clawson reported that some little difficulty had arisen in the Davis Stake, growing out of a ruling made by the late Geo. Q. Cannon, genl. supt. Sunday Schools, that in the removal or death of a ward superintendent of Sabbath Schools, the said superintendency was not disorganized but the assistants continued in office. Upon motion of Pres. Smith this ruling was reversed and it was decided that a superintendency of a Sunday School should [p.318] be governed by the rule that is had in other presidencies in the church.

Song, “Glory to God on High.” Benediction by Apostle Jno. H. Smith.

[Sunday, 29 September 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 10 a.m. Fast meeting at the temple, Pres. Lorenzo Snow presiding. In his remarks Pres. Snow said in part: I know the destiny of the Latter-day Saints. I know my destiny, providing I keep in the path the Lord has marked out. I know what you—brethren and sisters—can reach. We are all the children of God—all that live upon the earth. God loves us all. When Jesus died, he died for the whole human family. He died that we might become Gods and Goddesses in eternity. Latter-day Saints are tried, have their troubles and disappointments. We cannot obtain a fullness of joy in this world. It was not intended that we should. Some will secure a fullness of glory hereafter, and others will receive it in part. There are three glories and other conditions that are not so glorious, and the Lord will bring his children into those conditions. As to the Latter-day Saints, the Lord designs that they shall receive a fullness of Celestial glory, and they are destined to become Gods in eternity. Jesus was God before he came into the world and he was God after he came, while a babe in Bethlehem, but he did not know it.

[Tuesday, 1 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and warm. 10 a.m. Quarterly conference of the Twelve at the temple. Present: Apostles Brigham Young,  Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Abraham O. Woodruff, and Rudger Clawson. Song, “A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief.” Prayer by Apostle Woodruff. Song, “Praise to the Man Who Communed with Jehovah.”

Apostle Young was the first speaker and said in substance that he had good reason to believe that if Pres. Snow should pass away suddenly, he would die a poor man financially and his family would be left in need. He felt that Pres. Snow should take steps, while living, to provide for his family that they might be made comfortable in a time to come. If the brethren approved of it, he would like so to express himself to President Snow, and he believed that [p.319] the President would appreciate the good feelings of his brethren.

Apostle Smith expressed his approval of the suggestion and said it would be in harmony with the course taken by Presidents Brigham Young, Jno. Taylor, and Wilford Woodruff, who each in his time provided for their families while yet they were with us. If we were living in the United Order, these matters would be properly adjusted. The families of our leaders—especially their widows—should be cared for within reason, but of course they should be frugal and industrious. He also felt to endorse the idea and proposition that if any wife of an apostle (be the apostle alive or dead) be found lacking in those things needful for her comfort, provision should be made in such case that it shall not be necessary for her to call upon the bishop each week of her life.

Apostle Teasdale said that he was in harmony with the views expressed. He felt that there was no need for a wife of the President or an apostle to suffer for the necessities of life.

Apostle Taylor felt that Brother Brigham’s suggestion was inspired of the Lord, and it, therefore, had his hearty approval. Apostle Lund said that he felt to be one with his brethren in this matter. Apostle Merrill felt that Brother Brigham’s suggestion came as an inspiration. Apostle Woodruff said that he felt that the wives of our leading men should not be left to suffer for the common necessities of life.

Apostle Clawson read from the Book of Covenants, as follows: Sec. 7, verses 12 to 15; Sec. 24, verses 1 to 10, and Sec. 26, verses 3 to 9. He said he felt to endorse the suggestions made and believed it to be in harmony with the revelations of God as read. Apostle Young said that he would submit the matter to President Snow.

Apostle Woodruff called attention to the fact that Elder [John E.] Magleby, president of the New Zealand Mission, and Elder [Walter C.] Lyman, president of the Northern States Mission, had been a long time absent from home and felt that we ought to recommend their release to return home. No formal action taken.

Apostle Young said that in all probability Pres. Snow would consult the brethren as to the successor of the late Thos. E. Ricks, president of Fremont Stake. He asked the brethren to be thinking about this matter. Spoke in reference to the duty of the Twelve in opening the door of the gospel to the nations of the earth. Said [p.320] that President Snow’s mind of late had been impressed with the importance of this obligation which rested upon his brethren, and he had several times within a recent period expressed a wish that they should take the subject into consideration. Brother Brigham felt that the question we should now seek to answer is this: where are the nations, not already visited, to whom the gospel might be carried by the Twelve? His mind, he said, had rested upon South America, and possibly fields might be opened up in Brazil, the Argentine Republic, La Plata, Montevideo, and other places. It was thought that at the close of the war South Africa would be a good field.

Apostle Smith said that he would feel a little chary about recommending himself or any member of the quorum for a mission, as he conceded that this right belonged to the First Presidency. The apostles are here and are ready to go to the ends of the earth at their bidding.

Apostle Young explained that President Snow did not expect the apostles to call themselves to fill missions, but simply desired them to suggest new fields for missionary work. Upon the recommendation of Apostle Taylor, it was decided that an atlas be secured for reference and that a goodly portion of the time tomorrow be devoted to this subject.

Minutes read and approved. Benediction by Apostle Smith. The meeting was adjourned until 10 a.m. Wednesday to give the brethren an opportunity to attend the opening of the fair.

[Wednesday, 2 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 10 a.m. I attended a meeting of the executive committee of the Utah Light and Power Co.

10:30. Continuation of the quarterly conference of the Twelve. I came in a little late. The brethren were discussing the wisdom of opening the door of the gospel to South America. It was thought by some that it might be a good plan to plant a colony at Montevideo, Uruguay, or at some other point, and extend the work into the regions round about. Apostle Taylor moved that we recommend to the Presidency that a mission be established in South America. Carried by unanimous vote. As to planting a colony that matter would be determined by events following the establishment of a mission, which was of the first importance.

[p. 321] Some discussion was indulged in with reference to the necessity of providing some means, by the building of a temple or otherwise, for giving the blessings of the house of the Lord—at least in part—to the saints who live in the far distant Sandwich Islands, Mexico, and other places from which our people do not emigrate to Zion.

Apostle Cowley reported his recent visit to Arizona and Mexico. Had enjoyed the trip very much and found the saints feeling well, except as to Maricopa Stake. The people there appeared to be about ready to pull up and move away. During the presidency of Brother [Collins R.] Hakes some 500 had left the stake. President Hakes, he thought, was not a strong enough man to hold them there. He had united a number of young people in marriage by the sealing ordinance but regretted that it had to be done outside the temple. Apostle Cowley also reported that he was introduced to a Russian gentleman in San Francisco, who had translated portions of the Book of Mormon and the Voice of Warning into the Russian language, and had sent the same to St. Petersburg, where there were about 40 of his countrymen investigating the principles of the gospel. It was decided that this matter should be referred to Apostle Francis M. Lyman, president of the European Mission.

Benediction by Apostle Teasdale. There were present at the meeting: Apostles Brigham Young, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot.

2 p.m. Continuation of meetings. Present: Apostles Brigham Young, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot. Song, “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah.” Prayer by Apostle Clawson. Song, “O Awake! My Slumbering Minstrel.”

Apostle Taylor read from an atlas the names of the countries which had not been visited by our elders, and where the sound of the gospel had never been heard, and some discussion followed upon this topic. Apostle Clawson read a letter from Apostle Lyman, which clearly set forth his views relative to the gathering of the saints to Zion. Apostle Cowley stated that some of the missions were being impoverished by the release of elders and that [p.322] it is of the highest importance to call others immediately to take their places.

Song, “Lord, Thou Wilt Hear Me When I Pray.” Benediction by Apostle Taylor.

[Thursday, 3 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear in morning; raining during afternoon. 10 a.m. Continuation of conference of the Twelve. Present: Apostles Brigham Young, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot, [and John H. Smith]. Song, “Away with Our Fears,” Prayer by Apostle Cowley. Song, “For the Strength of the Hills We Bless Thee.”

Apostle Smith was the first speaker and said he regretted his absence yesterday, which was occasioned by his attendance at court. He was in touch with his brethren and the Presidency. He had spent a fair share of his time from home during the past three months in the line of his duty. Spoke of the need of more elders in the Southern States. Also called attention to the friendship of many prominent men in the nation for the Latter-day Saints, and how the Lord was using them to accomplish his purposes.

Apostle Woodruff spoke of the necessity of something being done for the Maricopa Stake. A change should be made in the presidency. Apostle Taylor moved that we recommend to the Presidency the reorganization of the Maricopa Stake. Carried.

Apostle Clawson moved that it be the sense of the meeting that the committee who have the matter in hand should represent to the Presidency the necessity of getting out a cheap edition of the Book of Mormon. Carried.

11:30 a.m. Presidents Snow and Smith came in. Apostle Brigham Young submitted two recommendations, namely, the establishing of a mission in South America and the reorganization of the Maricopa Stake. Pres. Snow asked Brother Brigham as to whom the apostles would suggest to open a mission in South America. He replied that the Twelve had no recommendation to make, but every one of them was ready to respond to a call. Matter taken under advisement.

Apostle Cowley reported the following ordinations while on his trip south: Orson Wilkin, bishop of Nutrioso, Arizona; Leroy [p.323] Gibbons, bp. of Concho, Arizona; Christopher I. Kempe, patriarch; Wm. Henry Solomon, patriarch, Snowflake Stake; David Weech, bishop of Pima, St. Joseph Stake; Joseph Taylor, patriarch, St. Joseph Stake; Edwin E. Thompson, bishop of Franklin, St. Joseph Stake; Lehi Larson, bishop of Matthews, St. Joseph Stake. These ordinations were approved by unanimous vote. Apostle Cowley also reported that Joseph Cluff of St. Joseph Stake had been preaching false doctrine and was in this way making considerable [trouble] for the brethren. They were on the point of handling him for his fellowship when Bro. Cowley left. Spoke of conditions in the Maricopa Stake as being very unfavorable.

Apostle Smith gave an account of conditions prevailing in the Maricopa Stake from the beginning. The heat of that country at times is intense, and many people cannot live there, but it is a fruitful land. The members of the church there have sold the controlling interest in the canal to a corporation from which bad results have followed. What is lacking today is a leader among our people there.

President Snow felt that the water should be resecured and a strong man sent there to preside. Action deferred until Pres. Hakes could be seen to furnish definite information concerning the water prospects.

The question of providing means for the giving of endowments to the saints living in Arizona and Mexico was discussed. Apostle Smith moved that an architect be employed to draft plans for an endowment [house] to cost $30,000 with a view of erecting said building in Arizona or Mexico, providing the people in that part of the country desired it and would bear the expense of its cost. Carried.

At this point the tables were spread for the sacrament, Apostle Young being mouth in offering the blessing. While at the table Pres. Snow made some allusions to the Prophet Joseph Smith and said that he did many things which tried the faith of the people, and some apostatized. He thought it likely that such might be the case in our day. Referred to the Elks Carnival and the part his daughter, Mabel, had taken as queen. This action on his part might try the faith of some of the people, perhaps some of the apostles, but it was right and would accomplish good. He felt assured of this.

[p. 324] After the Presidency had withdrawn, the minutes of the meeting were read and adopted. The brethren of the Twelve were unanimous in the opinion that the people in the south would not be satisfied with an endowment house, but would want a temple, though modest in appearance and cost. The thought was expressed that a temple sufficient to meet their wants would cost but little more than an endowment house. Apostle Young was delegated to bring this matter to the attention of the Presidency. Adjourned to Jan. 7th, 1902.

[Saturday, 5 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 7:30 p.m. General priesthood meeting. Bishop Wm. B. Preston. Topics treated. The importance of being one in the priesthood. The title of church property to rest in the bishops. Duties of the lesser priesthood.

Apostle Brigham Young. Topics treated. Duties of the lesser priesthood. Immorality among the young people of Zion. We will be driven into the United Order. Tithing.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith. Topics treated. Tithing. Importance of watching the young and teaching them the gospel. The power of example. Keeping the Sabbath day holy. Defined the priesthood as the power of God conferred upon man. Not absolutely necessary to ordain an elder a seventy in order to preach the gospel. Proper persons to be recommended to take missions. Counseled against secret societies. Deplored the assassination of Pres. Wm. McKinley.

[Monday, 7 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. Meeting of the general authorities, presidents of stakes, bishops of wards, and others, Pres. Jos. F. Smith presiding. Meeting held in the assembly hall.

The speakers were Pres. Jos. F. Smith, who spoke of the importance of punctuality. Jno. R. Winder. Topics treated. Rules to be observed by those who come to the temple.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith. Topics. People who go to the temple should be clean and pure. Church indebtedness well in hand, so that the church is not embarrassed and will be able to meet its obligations when they come due. The highest interest now paid is 4% and 6%, as against 10% formerly. The church school system and the new [p.325] move now contemplated of uniting several stakes into a school district.

Rudger Clawson. Topics treated. The duties of the lesser priesthood. Also the proper keeping of records in the stakes and wards. Submitted a plan, through questions to be answered, whereby bishops could give a clear idea of conditions prevailing in their wards. It was decided to send a copy of the questions to each stake president.

B. H. Roberts. Topics treated. Missionary work under the auspices of the Y.M.M.I.A. Reverence for the name of Deity to be taught in the associations this winter.

Apostle Jno. W. Taylor. Topics treated. The breaking of the Sabbath day by hunting and otherwise. Duties of the teacher.

Apostle A. O. Woodruff. Topics treated. Ventilation. Bp. Wm. B. Preston. Topics treated. Tithing. Lesser priesthood. Apostle Lund made brief remarks. Apostle Brigham Young. Topics treated. The duties of the acting and regular teachers. Pres. Smith. Topics. The quorums of the priesthood should not meet conjointly but separately. We should sustain the Church Chronology.

[Tuesday, 8 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 10 a.m. Meeting of the missionaries called to labor among the Mutual Improvement Associations throughout the church this winter, at the Latter-day Saints College building. Members of the general board present, and 58 missionaries out of 63 in attendance. The missionaries present were divided into 7 bodies and set apart, which consumed about 30 minutes. I give the names of those whom I set apart: Geo. W. Daybell, Jos. Wright, and Jas. Yardley. Instructions were given by Elder J. Golden Kimball, Apostle Jno. H. Smith, and myself.

[Wednesday, 9 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. In connection with my appointment as second counselor in the First Presidency of the church, I here record an interview with President Lorenzo Snow. I called at the Beehive House by request at 12:30 noon, Sunday, Oct. 6th, 1901, between meetings of the conference. President Snow, being quite feeble with a bad cold, had just arisen. He said to me in substance, Brother Clawson, if I go to the conference meeting this [p.326] afternoon—and I must go, providing my health and the weather permits—you will be presented as my second counselor. I have been thinking about you. I remember your experience in the Southern States, when your missionary companion [Joseph Standing] was shot down in cold blood and you, yourself, were threatened with martyrdom, and but narrowly escaped. I remember your long imprisonment in the Utah penitentiary—three years and a little over—for having accepted and obeyed the principle of plural marriage. And the Lord was well pleased with the manner in which you met this great trial. I remember your appointment to the presidency of the Box Elder Stake of Zion and your labors in that capacity for a little upwards of ten years, and with reference to that mission, I have often remarked that I knew of no young man in Zion, who had been so greatly blessed with success as you had been. I remember when this appointment by President Woodruff and the brethren was made known to you (and President Snow smiled) you were greatly agitated and said, “Why, if I am chosen as president of that stake, what shall I say, I cannot preach.” It was a very great trial to you, but you were blessed and sustained of the Lord, and your labors were pleasing and acceptable unto him. I have thought about these things, and the Spirit of the Lord whispers to me that I am to select you for one of my counselors.

I said in reply, “President Snow, there is only one consideration that makes it possible for me to accept this great responsibility, and that consideration is the fact that I know this to be the work of God. The Lord can qualify and make me equal to the obligation, man cannot.” The President replied, “Yes, that is true.” Thus ended the interview.

At about 2 o’clock the sky was overcast with blackness and a heavy storm threatened. President Snow was quite feeble and everything seemed to be unfavorable to his leaving home; but he felt impelled to go to the tabernacle (and did so) because of the important matters pressing upon his mind.

At 10 a.m. I attended the monthly meeting of the directors of the Utah Light and Power Co. President Snow—the president of the co.—was not in attendance on acct. of sickness. He, however, held a meeting at his home with the directors of the Saltair Beach Co., but was quite ill with his cold at the close and had the brethren administer to him, after  which he felt improved. I attended to [p.327] several matters of business during the afternoon.

I would here record that on Tuesday morning, Oct. 8th, President Snow sent for me and said he designed my first official act as his counselor to be an act of charity. He instructed me to obtain full information regarding the widows of the following named brethren with special reference to their means of support: Heber C. Kimball, Orson Hyde, Jno. Taylor, Orson Pratt, Parley P. Pratt, and Daniel H. Wells. The purpose of this mission, now given me, was not stated, but from the views expressed at one of the meetings of the Presidency and Twelve, I had every reason to believe that President Snow designed rendering assistance from the church to the widows of these brethren in all cases where help was needed.

I have received many hearty congratulations from the brethren and sisters, as I meet them, upon my appointment as second counselor in the First Presidency. Apostle Matthias F. Cowley told me that he had received a manifestation, while in Mexico some time ago, that I would be appointed to said position. The following is a copy of some of the letters addressed to me since the general conference:

Mount Pleasant
Oct. 7, 1901

President Rudger Clawson
Salt Lake City

Dear Brother:

When you were here some time ago, I felt impressed that you would some day be elevated to the high and holy calling as above named. Yesterday saw it an accomplished fact. I am indeed pleased. Accept my honest, sincere congratulations.

I most heartily endorse the article in today’s Herald, “The New President’s Life,” and I believe you will in every phrase of your future life honor the position, to which President Snow has called you by the direction of the Almighty. On the eve of my 82nd birthday and my 60th year’s connection with this people, I repeat my congratulations with a fervent prayer for your success as one of the Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of [p.328] Latter-day Saints.

I remain yours cordially,
(signed) David Candland.

P.S. Please excuse my presuming to write you; I could not resist.

Rexburg, Idaho
Oct. 8th, 1901

Pres. Rudger Clawson

Dear Brother and Friend:
Permit me to extend to you my heartfelt congratulations upon your promotion, and I assure you of my sincerest invocations to the Great Master for his choicest blessings to rest upon you.

Most respectfully yours,
(signed) C. L. French.

Brigham City
Oct 7th, 1901

Rudger Clawson
Salt Lake City, Utah

Dear Brother Clawson:

Accept my hearty congratulations and approval to the high position to which you have been chosen to preside. When you were selected to be a member in the quorum of the apostles, I was at the conference, and a thought seized me quick: “He is the right man and has gone up on his merits, and he will not be one whit behind the rest, and the people will soon know of his worth.” Future history confirmed the thought.

I am sure the Lord will prepare you for the duty to which you have been called, for you are an earnest worker.

Wishing you well, I have the pleasure of being,

Your brother,

(signed) John H. Horsley.
[p. 329] Office of Woman’s Exponent

Salt Lake City
Oct. 9th, 1901

President Rudger Clawson

My Dear Brother:

As one of your old friends and one who has watched your course from childhood days, allow me to offer my congratulations on your recent appointment as counselor to our revered president, seer, and revelator, and our good brother, President Lorenzo Snow. I have the utmost confidence in your integrity, and in your loyalty to the gospel, and to those with whom your lot has been cast in the holy priesthood.

May you be as true, and as faithful, and as diligent as President [Daniel H.] Wells was when he filled a like position to Brigham Young. I think no man could be more loyal to another than he was to that great pioneer and leader.

I rejoiced greatly when President Snow succeeded to the Presidency for many reasons, but particularly because his sister, Eliza Snow, [whom] I so loved and revered, had on more than one occasion prophesied that her brother would yet be “Our President.” I remember your spiritual tendency as a boy, or young man perhaps would be a better term, and I am glad to see the opportunity opened to you to serve this people. And while you hold in your power opportunities for higher spiritual development and attainments, do not forget the sisters in their sphere in the church—and may the choicest blessings of heaven be yours is my desire and prayer.

Yours truly &c.,
(signed) Aunt Em[meline] Wells.

LaGrande, Oregon

Pres. Rudger Clawson
Salt Lake City

[p. 330] Dear Brother:

The Union Stake of Zion sends congratulations to you and wish you a powerful administration.

I congratulate you and pledge you my hearty support in every particular. May God the Father give you the spirit of leadership which has always characterized those holding the position you now hold, and may the living water ever flow from your heart into ours that we may all be mutually benefited and power thereby given us unto salvation is the fervent prayer of

Yours most humbly,
(signed) F. S. Bramwell.

(Note: Brother Bramwell is president of the Union Stake.)

My brother, Spencer Clawson, wrote me a very warm letter of congratulation, which for the moment I have misplaced, and, therefore, cannot enter a copy of the same on this page.

My reply to him was as follows:

Salt Lake City
Oct. 9, 1901

Dear Brother Spencer:

I take this opportunity to apologize for my apparent neglect in acknowledging receipt of your letter. Believe me when I say, that I deeply appreciate the kind wishes you express for my success as second counselor to President Lorenzo Snow. It is dear to me, as I know it must be to you, that the Lord only can qualify me for the great responsibility, and were it not for this important consideration, I never could have been equal to its acceptance.

I fervently trust that the faith and confidence of the Latter-day Saints, always so much to be desired, may be given me, and that my future life shall be actuated by a spirit of integrity and devotion to the cause of Zion.

I remain your brother,
[signed] Rudger Clawson.

P.S. What with conference meetings, priesthood [p.331] meetings, and Young Men’s missionary meetings, I have been extremely busy since your letter came to hand. R. C.

During the afternoon of today, Wednesday, Pres. Snow was taken severely sick, which was due to his cold, with a threatened attack of pneumonia, and obliged to go to his bed. I called at the Beehive [House], and rendered what assistance I could until midnight. At that hour he seemed to be somewhat better.

[Thursday, 10 October 1901] [Salt Lake City.] At 5 a.m. Thursday morning a messenger came to my home and notified me that President Snow was much worse. I immediately went to his bedside and found the President in a very serious condition. President Smith, and the apostles, and members of his family had been summoned to his bedside, and responded with the utmost dispatch. Pres. Snow’s condition was so critical, that we administered to him at once, without waiting for President Smith. Apostle Cowley anointed, and I confirmed the same. We were assisted by Apostle Woodruff and LeRoi C. Snow.

President Smith [and] a number of the apostles came in a little later. Pres. Snow’s condition was quite critical all the morning. Pneumonia had set in. At 11 a.m. Pres. Smith and the apostles repaired to the temple to offer up special prayer in the circle for President Snow and also to attend to any pressing business that should be brought to their attention.

11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. Jos. F. Smith, President Rudger Clawson, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Reed Smoot, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “See How the Morning Sun.” Pres. Smith was mouth in prayer, and I was mouth in the circle.

A long letter was read from Ben J. Cluff of the Brigham Young expedition, South America, dated at Columbia. The clerk also read an interesting communication from Apostle Francis M. Lyman, Liverpool.

At this point Brother Arthur Winter came in and notified the brethren that Pres. Snow was much worse, and a moment later Brother L. John Nuttall brought the same message. Benediction [by] Apostle Smoot.

[p. 332] The brethren immediately repaired to the Beehive House. We found President Snow’s symptoms very alarming.

By direction of Pres. Smith the brethren and all present knelt around his bed, and I was mouth in offering prayer. The President steadily grew worse as the day wore on, and at 3:35 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 10, 1901, he breathed his last. His final moments appeared to be free from pain. Thus passed away Israel’s great leader, president, prophet, seer, and revelator, and the church was in a moment plunged into the deepest mourning. It is not necessary here to speak of his life, character, and works—for his life is an open book to the entire people of the Latter-day Saints. Nevertheless, it may be said, he was a great leader and a man of God, much beloved by the people. He died full of years (at the age of 87½) and his work was accomplished. He had always shown an interest in me and mine, and I esteemed him as a staunch and undeviating brother and friend, and I deeply mourn his departure. I feel that the Church of Christ has met with a great and immeasurable loss in his death.

The news of President Snow’s demise quickly spread and was soon known throughout Zion, and I doubt not throughout the world. A cablegram was sent to Apostle Lyman in Europe and Apostle Grant in Japan. Apostle Lund is in Nevada and cannot be reached.

Pres. Smith called the apostles together and suggested the appointment of a committee of two to represent the Twelve—naming myself and Apostle Woodruff—to meet with a committee of the family to make arrangements for the funeral. Suggestion adopted by unanimous vote. The committee from the Twelve and the committee from the family were, therefore, named as the general committee on funeral arrangements, and the personnel is as follows: Rudger Clawson and Abraham O. Woodruff, representing the Twelve Apostles, and Oliver G. Snow, Lorenzo Snow, Jr., Lucius A. Snow, Frank Snow, Alphonzo H. Snow, Mansfield Snow, LeRoi C. Snow, and B. Morris Young, sons of President Snow, representing the family.

[Friday, 11 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 10 a.m. Meeting of the Presidency and Twelve. Present: Pres. Jos. F. Smith, Pres. Rudger [p.333] Clawson, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, and Reed Smoot.

It was decided that the brethren of the Twelve, excepting Jno. W. Taylor, who is lame, should act as pallbearers at the funeral of Pres. Snow; also, that carriages be dispensed with and the line of march be taken up on foot from the Beehive [House] to the tabernacle, and from the tabernacle to the Oregon Short Line depot. The sons of Pres. Snow were appointed as a second relief corps of pallbearers, and the Seven Presidents—excepting Brother Fjeldsted, who is feeble—as a 3rd corps of pallbearers.

It was decided that the body of Pres. Snow should lie in state at the Beehive [House] from 7 a.m. Sunday morning until 9:45 a.m. and from 9:45 a.m. to 10 a.m. The casket should be open to the family only; that at 10 a.m. the funeral cortege should take up its march to the tabernacle as follows: police; band; Presidency; Twelve, and Patriarch Jno. Smith; pallbearers; casket; family of deceased; Presiding Bishopric; presidents of stakes; bishopric of 18th ward, the ward where Pres. Snow resided; wives of the general authorities; general board of Relief Societies, general board of the Y.M.M.I.A., general board of the Y.L.M.I.A.; general board of the Deseret Sunday School Union; general board of the Primary Associations; general board of education; church school boards; general board of Religion Classes; directorates: Z.C.M.I., Zion’s Saving Bank, Utah Light and Power Co., Salt Lake and Los Angeles Ry. Co., Saltair Beach Co., Grass Creek Coal Co.; general public.

It was decided that services should begin at the tabernacle at 10:30 a.m. and conclude at 12:30 noon; that the speakers should be selected from among the Presidency and Twelve; that the tabernacle should furnish the opening and closing songs, and that the temple choir should sing two of President Snow’s favorite hymns between speakers; that at the close of the services the line of march should be taken up to the depot; that the special funeral train should leave for Brigham City at 1:30 p.m., sharp, reaching Brigham at 3 p.m., where it would be met by the authorities and people of Brigham City and Box Elder Co. Carriages would be furnished and the procession headed by the presidency of the Box Elder Stake, high council, and stake boards, would take up its line of march to the grave.

[p. 334] A letter from Mr. [David E.] Burley of the Short Line was read. He stated officially that a complimentary special funeral train was at the service of Pres. Smith to convey the body of Pres. Snow to its final resting place. It was moved that the kind offer of the Oregon Short Line Railway Co. be accepted, and that a letter of thanks be sent to Mr. Burley. Carried.

It was decided by unanimous vote that the counselors of Pres. Snow should act as such in the First Presidency, being in charge of the affairs of the church, until after the funeral. Myself and Apostle Woodruff were appointed as a committee to arrange for a floral offering of the Twelve—the design to be, in a general way, three columns in white representing the First Presidency, with Twelve stars to represent the Twelve Apostles (which duty, we afterwards fulfilled). Benediction by Apostle Jno. W. Taylor.

[Sunday, 13 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 8:10 a.m. We called at the Beehive [House], and found many people coming in to view the remains of Pres. Snow, which reposed in a beautiful white casket. A number of very handsome floral pieces had already been sent in. At 9:45 the doors were closed to the general public, and the family [was] left with their dead for 15 minutes.

At 10 a.m. sharp the line of march was taken up to the tabernacle in the order heretofore referred to, the band playing a funeral march. The tabernacle was reached at 10:20 a.m. The building was draped in white and looked chaste and beautiful. A splendid picture—oil painting—from the temple hung on the organ. Numerous handsome floral pieces had been received and were placed around the casket. The mourners and others in the procession were quickly seated, and the services began, Pres. Smith presiding.

A vast throng of people filled the body of the hall and the galleries.

Program

Song, “O My Father,” tabernacle choir
Prayer, M. W. Merrill Song,
“Zion Stands with Hills Surrounded,” choir
Remarks, Apostle B. Young
Remarks, Apostle J. H. Smith
[p. 335]Song, “Who Are These Arrayed in White,” temple choir
Remarks, Apostle J. W. Taylor
Song, “Shall We Meet beyond the River,” temple choir
Remarks, Pres. R. Clawson
Remarks, Pres. Jos. F. Smith
Thanks expressed for family, Pres. R. Clawson
Song, “Glory to God on High,” tab. choir
Benediction, Bp. Jno. R. Winder.

The singing and the remarks were appropriate and impressive. His life and character were dwelt upon, and many comforting words were spoken.

In my remarks I alluded to my personal, intimate association with Pres. Snow in the Box Elder Stake for upwards of ten years, at which time I enjoyed the advantage of his experience and wisdom. Also referred to my association with him in prison for 11 months, and notwithstanding he was a man of culture and refinement, he bore the trial with great fortitude and patience, and at the same time with a cheerful spirit. Spoke of the sacred shout offered up in the “Pen,” led by President Snow.

Said that, in looking at a group picture taken years ago, I was reminded of the fact that we are in the midst of great changes. The faces shown on that picture, I said, were Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Geo. A. Smith, Orson Hyde, Orson Pratt, Jno. Taylor, Wilford Woodruff, Ezra T. Benson, Chas. C. Rich, Lorenzo Snow, Erastus Snow, Franklin D. Richards, Geo. Q. Cannon, Jos. F. Smith, Brigham Young, Jr., and Albert Carrington. Of these sixteen men, two only remained, namely, Pres. Jos. F. Smith, who stands at the head, and Brigham Young, Jr., who stands next to him. Notwithstanding thirteen [fourteen] of these stalwarts had fallen, the work of God moves on in majesty and power, and I testified that it is the work of God, and not of man, and God would have the glory. Said that at the last fast meeting at the temple after the choir had sung his favorite song, “Shall We Meet beyond the River,” Pres. Snow arose and said, “Brethren and sisters, I say to you, we shall meet beyond the river. God bless you.” I invoked the blessings of the Lord upon the family of President Snow.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith in his remarks paid a high tribute of praise to the faithfulness and worth of Pres. Snow. The services closed at 12:30 and the casket, mourners, and others passed quickly out of [p.336] the building, and the cortege moved down the street without hitch or hindrance. The band played a solemn but beautiful funeral march. There were thousands of people thronging the streets, who were deeply moved by the impressiveness of the occasion. [We] arrived at the depot, the casket was placed in a special car, the family and invited guests were seated with dispatch, and the train moved out at 1:30—the time appointed. A quick run was made to Brigham City, but the train stopped 5 minutes at Ogden, where the people and Sunday School children had gathered by the thousands. A very beautiful floral offering was tendered from the priesthood and Sunday Schools of Weber Stake. The train arrived at Brigham promptly at 3 p.m.—the appointed hour—and found in waiting the hearse drawn by four gray horses, and numerous conveyances to carry the 360 people who had come from Salt Lake. They were placed in the carriages with great celerity, and the cortege moved on, headed by the presidency, priesthood, and stake boards of the Box Elder Stake and Held’s band, which played almost the entire distance to the cemetery, one mile and a half. As the funeral train passed along Main Street the eyes of the family and visitors rested upon some eight or nine hundred Sunday School children, who had been lined up on the west side of the road, each child holding a bouquet of flowers in the right hand, while many of the older ones were weeping.

[We] arrived at the cemetery, the conveyances were quickly brought to their places, and the family and saints gathered at the place of interment. Great care had been given to the preparation of the grave, which was seven feet deep. The casket when in place rested in a brick vault three feet high, the cover being heavy rock slabs. The casket having been placed in the grave, Apostle Geo. Teasdale offered the dedicatory prayer. As chairman of the general committee, I tendered the thanks and appreciation of the family, and also the Presidency and Twelve, to the people of Brigham City and Box Elder Stake for the great manifestation of their love for President Snow, as shown by their reception of his mortal remains and the thoroughness of all arrangements made for his interment.

The filling of the grave and its covering with the floral offerings brought from Salt Lake was left in special charge of the presidency of the stake, and the family and friends returned at once to the train, which left for Salt Lake at 5:10, being ten minutes [p.337] after the hour set. Apostles Merrill and Cowley remained behind for the purpose of holding a meeting with the saints in the Brigham City tabernacle, which would partake somewhat of the character of a memorial service. It would be well to record that a memorial service was held by the people of Brigham City in the tabernacle at 11 a.m.

The train made a phenomenal run to Salt Lake, arriving at 6:35 p.m. So far as I know all the arrangements of the funeral were carried out as determined upon without a single hitch or jar, and without delay, and if President Snow had been near in spirit, as we have reason to believe that he was, there is no doubt but that he was well pleased.

[Monday, 14 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 10 a.m. The family of President Snow met in the Beehive [House] parlors and held a consultation in relation to the President’s affairs. It was decided by unanimous vote that Oliver G. Snow, Leslie W. Snow, LeRoi C. Snow, Rudger Clawson, and Abraham O. Woodruff be appointed and authorized, as a committee of five, to go through President Snow’s desk and safe in the office, examine carefully all his papers, and by this means ascertain, if possible, as to whether he left a will and also the amount of means going to his estate. The committee at once set to work and were busily engaged from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. The papers were all carefully assorted, many church documents being found among them. There was no will. The amount of means listed was in round numbers as follows: cash $6800, church bonds $3000, stock $400, total: $10,300. It is thought that still further holdings in stock will be found.

[Thursday, 17 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. Meeting at the temple. Present: Pres. Jos. F. Smith, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Anthon H. Lund, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk, and Jno. Smith, patriarch. Song, “This Morning in Silence I Ponder and Mourn.” Prayer by Apostle Smith, with Apostle Merrill as mouth in the circle. Song, “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah.”

[p. 338] The clerk read a letter from Apostle Francis M. Lyman. He made particular mention of the plan he had adopted of bringing the local ministry in the mission field into active service, thereby leaving the elders free to extend their labors into places not yet visited. Also referred to a letter from Elder Hugh J. Cannon and spoke of the advisability of publishing the Book of Mormon and Doctrine and Covenants in the German language—or at least to get out a new and revised edition. It was moved that such publication be made under the direction of Apostle Lyman. Carried. This motion was made by Apostle Woodruff.

It was moved that a ten-thousand edition of the Book of Mormon be published at Kansas City at 21 cents, as quoted by an eastern house, and that the work be done under the direction of Pres. [James G.] Duffin of the S.W. States Mission. Carried.

After some discussion, it was decided to use the tithing paid in Denmark the coming year, for the purchase of a meeting house as already under contemplation. The clerk read a letter from Bp. [Amos] Wright of Bennington, in which he stated that he had been appointed to take a mission to the Indians of the Wind River Reservation; that the Indians were anxious to see him; but that he was in straightened circumstances. A motion prevailed to the effect that he be granted proper assistance.

A letter was read from Mr. A. L. Hartley of Independence, Missouri, in which he offered for sale a portion of the temple block there. It was decided that authority be given to Pres. Duffin of the S.W. States Mission to visit Independence and investigate the matter and report to the Presidency. Elder Moses Taylor reported the labors of the presidency of the Summit Stake in the recent reorganization of said stake, which is now complete, a good work having been done.

At this point President Smith arose and said in part that he would deplore the necessity of doing anything that might have the appearance of being premature, but he felt that it was urgent that some action be taken with reference to the reorganization of the First Presidency. Complications might arise. The church property which some years ago escheated to the United States was returned to the First Presidency, and the law did not contemplate a condition arising where there would be no First Presidency. Furthermore, the trustee-in-trust should be appointed without unneces-[p.339]sary delay to properly execute deeds and other official church documents and to hold the church property. He said that he did not know how the brethren of the Twelve viewed this matter, but remarked that if they were ready for immediate action, he was.

Apostle Brigham Young said that he was heartily in favor of reorganizing the First Presidency, and nominated Pres. Jos. F. Smith as president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in all the world. Carried by unanimous vote. Pres. Smith accepted the action of the brethren and remarked that the time was ripe to sustain Brigham Young as president of the Twelve Apostles.

Pres. Smith said that he had selected his counselors and named Bp. Jno. R. Winder as the first and Apostle Anthon H. Lund as the second counselor. Sustained by unanimous vote. Apostle Lund, who was greatly surprised and deeply moved, said that he was willing to accept the appointment and expressed the hope that he might be equal to the responsibility.

It was moved and carried that Apostle Brigham Young be sustained as president of the Twelve Apostles. It was moved that President Jos. F. Smith be sustained as trustee-in-trust. Carried. It was moved that Pres. Jos. F. Smith be sustained as president of the Salt Lake Temple, with Jno. R. Winder as his first assistant. Carried.

At this point Bp. Winder was called in and notified by President Smith of his appointment. Was much affected. Remembered when Pres. Woodruff told him of his approaching appointment as 1st assistant to Pres. Snow in the temple, and asked him to say how he felt about it. In reply said he did not feel that he was qualified for the place. “Never mind,” said the president, “I will appoint you and the Lord will qualify you.” That is how I feel, said he, in regard to the present appointment.

It was moved that a general conference of the church be called for the 2nd Sunday in Nov. (the 10th) to ratify the said several actions as already taken. Carried.

Apostle Woodruff referred to the prophecy of his father to the effect that Jos. F. Smith would one day be president of the church. Apostle Woodruff predicted that his administration would be eventful.

The brethren were then set apart under the hands of the [p.340] Twelve and patriarch, as follows: Joseph F. Smith, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in all the world, Jno. Smith, patriarch, being mouth; Jno. R. Winder, 1st counselor to Pres. Smith, Jos. F. Smith, mouth; Anthon H. Lund, 2nd counselor to Pres. Smith, Brigham Young, mouth; Brigham Young, president of the Twelve Apostles, Jos. F. Smith, mouth.

Upon motion Rudger Clawson and Reed Smoot were appointed as an auditing committee. Benediction by Pres. Jno. R. Winder.

[Saturday, 19 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. I spent the day at the President’s office and finished entering in the record providing my annual financial statement (church accounts) for the year 1900. In the evening I had a long talk with President A. H. Lund regarding the financial condition of the church. Among other things, I told him that the present church indebtedness in round numbers amounted to $1,237,000.00.

[Thursday, 24 October 1901]

Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents Jos. F. Smith, Jno. R. Winder, and Anthon H. Lund, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale,  Jno. W. Taylor, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, and Reed Smoot, and Jno. Smith, patriarch; also Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “Praise to the Man Who Communed with Jehovah.” Prayer by Apostle Cowley. Song, “O, Give Me Back My Prophet Dear.”

Pres. Smith said that he had invited Bishop Preston, who was present, to meet with the brethren in order to learn his mind regarding a counselor to succeed Pres. Jno. R. Winder in the [Presiding] Bishopric. Bp. Preston arose and said that he had thought about the matter and had also made it a subject of prayer. He felt the loss of Bp. Winder. In reflecting upon a successor, he believed it would be wise to select a young man and would suggest the name of Orrin P. Miller, president of the Jordan Stake of Zion; he had also thought of Bp. Geo. H. Taylor of the 14th Ward, but the latter’s age was perhaps a little against him. It was moved that Orrin P. Miller be chosen and set apart as second counselor to Bp. [p.341] Wm. B. Preston. Carried by unanimous vote.

Apostle Smith moved that Hyrum Goff be sustained as president of the Jordan Stake. Carried unanimously. Bp. President [Preston] then retired.

President Smith arose and said, I believe in being frank with my brethren. I am going to make a suggestion and leave the result in your hands. I would be glad if we all had sons worthy of the apostleship, for I would like to see the sons of the apostles brought forward as far as possible. I feel that this is right. I now nominate, as it is my privilege so to do, my son, Hyrum M. Smith, to fill the vacancy in the quorum of Apostles and will leave the matter entirely with the brethren. All present spoke, one by one, and endorsed the nomination. Apostle Jno. H. Smith said that while he heartily endorsed the nomination, he felt that doubtless some fault would be found with our action, but at the same time he realized that there would be some to find fault with any action that might be taken in the premises. Pres. Smith made brief remarks. Was profoundly thankful to the brethren for the unanimity that had been manifested. No doubt some might find fault with the action of today, but faultfinders will always be in evidence among the people. He felt that it was his right to do as he had done. Hyrum is a good, honest, faithful, virtuous boy, and he had no doubt but that he would magnify the apostleship.

Stake conference appointments: Juab, Apostle Smoot; Bannock, Apostle Woodruff; Alpine, Apostle Clawson; Cache, Apostle Cowley; Fremont, Apostle Teasdale. Pres. O. C. Hoskins of Malad Stake recommended by letter the ordination of Geo. H. Facer as bishop of Cherry Creek. Carried.

By unanimous action of the council, the farm known as the Wilson Farm, church property, Maricopa Stake, was turned over to Pres. Collins Hakes of that stake for his sole use and benefit. The purpose of said action was to relieve Pres. Hakes of his present financial distress. The application of Elder Geo. Cluff of Emery Stake to plant a colony in Guatemala was not granted.

Elders Geo. Reynolds, Jas. E. Talmage, and Jno. Nicholson recommended by letter that the brick tithing granary building near the Latter-day Saints University be remodeled and used for the home of the Deseret Museum. Action was deferred until such time as an estimate of the cost of remodeling could be obtained.

[p. 342] A petition addressed to Pres. Angus M. Cannon, asking for a new ward organization just east of Liberty Park, was submitted and referred back to Pres. Cannon with power to act. Pres. Lund reported his recent visit to Nevada. While there he organized the Preston Ward with Hyrum S. Arnoldson as bishop. Also settled a water difficulty that was agitating the minds of the saints in the Lund and Preston Wards.

After some discussion it was decided that the balance due on the Brigham Young Memorial be brought forward and presented at the special conference on Nov. 10th. At this juncture Elder Hyrum M. Smith came in, and Apostle Jno. H. Smith by request informed him that he had been chosen an apostle and proceeded to deliver the usual charge, in brief as follows, to wit:

Brother Hyrum Smith, it is presumed that you are a moral man, that you observe the word of wisdom, that you subscribe to the principles of the gospel, that you accept the principle of plural marriage, and that you uphold and sustain in your heart the First Presidency, the Twelve, the patriarch, and other general authorities of the church. You are to be ready at any time to go and to come at the call of the Presidency. Your heart must be given to your God, your loyalty must never be questioned. You must be God-fearing, honest, just, and a tithe-payer.

President Smith said in part, I want to impress upon your mind that the law of God is the supreme law and that the will of God is the supreme will and that no authority on the earth is entitled to develop the law, as aforesaid, but the First Presidency and Twelve Apostles. You must be loyal and true to them—you must never falter or rebel. President Young told me upon one occasion that no man in the quorum of Apostles who falters or rebels can ever attain to the presidency of the church. And because they faltered, Orson Pratt and Orson Hyde lost their place of seniority in the quorum, and were consequently thrown out of the line to the presidency. Elder Smith said he know[s] this to be the work of God and would endeavor to [do] his duty, if ordained an apostle. Elder Hyrum Smith was then ordained a high priest and an apostle in the quorum of the Twelve Apostles, under the hands of all present, Pres. Jos. F. Smith being mouth. Benediction by President Brigham Young.

[Friday, 25 October 1901] [p. 343] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. I spent the forenoon at the President’s office, working on my annual church financial statement for 1901. 4 p.m. Gathering at President Frank Y. Taylor’s, Granite Stake. Present: Presidents Jos. F. Smith, Jno. R. Winder, and A. H. Lund, President Brigham Young, Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Hyrum M. Smith, and their wives, the presidency of the Granite Stake, the high council, and their wives, and a few others.

Program
Address of welcome, Pres. F. Y. Taylor. He said in substance that the presidency of the Granite Stake had contemplated for some time the pleasure and propriety of having the high council of the stake together in a social capacity. And in connection with this idea they had concluded to invite the Presidency of the church and the Twelve and their wives to be present also, that the members of the council might have the privilege of shaking hands with them, and of extending a more intimate acquaintance with the general authorities of the church. He felt that such action would prove to be of great benefit to his brethren of the Granite Stake. He had to report, he said, that the presidency and high council of his stake were in perfect harmony and union, and that they were all observers of the word of wisdom and tithe-payers, and that the members of the council were laboring diligently with the presidency to build up and strengthen the elders’ quorums and other organizations of the stake. He concluded by bidding the brethren and sisters a hearty welcome to his home and invited them to throw off all restraint and formality.

Response to the address of welcome, Pres. Jos. F. Smith. Pres. Smith said in substance: in behalf of the Presidency and Apostles, I accept the warm welcome tendered by Pres. Frank Y. Taylor. We have here with us tonight besides the Presidency and Twelve, the presidency of the Granite Stake, and high council, also one or more wives of those who have presided over the church—a wife of the Prophet Joseph Smith, of Brigham Young, of Jno. Taylor, of Wilford Woodruff, of Lorenzo Snow, and two of my wives.

I would like to say a few words upon a subject of interest to the Latter-day Saints. When word reached us of the death of Pres. [p.344] Wilford Woodruff, I took the news to Pres. Snow at the temple. He remarked that it was very sad and, addressing himself to me, said: Brother Joseph, Pres. Cannon will not live to lead the church but you will. I say to you that whenever the First Presidency become disorganized, it is the duty of the Twelve to effect a reorganization at the earliest possible moment. It is the will of the Lord that such action should be taken. Such was the counsel of Pres. Snow, and we have been led to reorganize the First Presidency and fill up the quorum of Apostles, and in all this there has been with us a spirit of unanimity, although some people may find fault with our action and feel that it was premature. There will always be some among us to find fault, I suppose.

Now, regarding the selection of my counselors, I have this to say, I thought about it and prayed over it. Had I consulted my personal feelings, the present arrangement is not exactly as it would have been. I had thought of others but whenever I came to the point of making a selection, these brethren who were chosen came into my mind, and I could not get away from them. I felt very warmly towards Brother Rudger Clawson, whom Pres. Lorenzo Snow chose as his second counselor, and would like to have taken him, but these my counselors were ever before me, and I feel that they were chosen of the Lord and that time will show it. Now, as to the selection of my son to fill the vacancy in the quorum of Apostles, I will say that it was done by the united action of the quorum. If there be those who will find fault, they do it as against the united action of the Twelve, and yet it was my action, too, for I heartily approved it and felt thankful to the Lord that I had a son worthy to be ordained to the apostleship. I believe he will prove himself worthy of his appointment. I shall be very happy to see the sons of my brethren, also, advanced in the authority of the priesthood to the quorum of Apostles and to other quorums.

There is another matter I would like to mention—a matter that will be brought strongly to the attention of the Latter-day Saints. I speak of the great evil of placing mortgages on the homes of the saints. It weakens the very bulwarks of Zion and we feel to proclaim against it. I am greatly pleased with the report made concerning the presidency and high council of the Granite Stake and feel to bless them in the name of the Lord.

Remarks, Horace Cummings. Brother Horace Cummings said [p.345] in part that he had a feeling in his heart some time ago, or rather a manifestation while in the temple at prayer circle meeting, that Brother Hyrum M. Smith, who was present and who impressed him as very much resembling his uncle [grandfather] Hyrum Smith, the patriarch, would one day be an apostle. He was thankful that he had had a manifestation of that which had already come to pass.

Remarks, Pres. Brigham Young. Pres. Young said in substance that the quorum of apostles were never more fully united than at the present time. He greatly rejoiced in the reorganization of the Presidency and the filling up of his quorum.

Remarks, Pres. Jno. R. Winder. Pres. Winder said: the death of Pres. Snow was a great shock to himself and the temple workers. My call to the Presidency was also a great shock to me. Pres. Woodruff, upon one occasion when he expected to die, gave me a mission to work in the temple and asked me what I thought about it. I replied that I did not feel qualified for the responsibility. He then said, “I will give you the mission and the Lord will qualify you.” This is how I feel in regard to my present appointment. When people congratulate me upon my connection with the First Presidency, I say to them: “Pray for me.” I feel to say that it is my determination to stand by and sustain President Smith to the last. Am pleased with conditions in this stake.

Remarks, Pres. A. H. Lund. Pres. Lund said that he was pleased with the spirit of this occasion. Great changes have been alluded to during the evening. The last time Pres. Snow spoke at a public gathering was at Apostle Reed Smoot’s on the Monday following the general conference. I had some conversation with him on that occasion and he asked in relation to the history of Joseph Smith that is now being written. I told him that we were getting out about 32 pages a week. He figured the matter up in his mind and said with some disappointment, “Why, I will be dead and buried before the work is accomplished.” I little thought that this prediction would be so soon fulfilled. Was thankful for the reorganization of the First Presidency and felt the wisdom of President Woodruff’s counsel, when he said, “Don’t let a month pass after my death before reorganizing the Presidency.”

During the evening the brethren and sisters sat down to a splendid banquet. The occasion was thoroughly enjoyed and re-[p.346]flected credit upon Pres. Frank Y. Taylor, his good wife, and all who assisted in entertaining.

[Sunday, 27 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy, threatening rain, and cool. 8 a.m. Left by train over D. and R. G. [Denver and Rio Grande] for Lehi to attend the Alpine Stake Conference, arriving at 9 a.m.

2 p.m. Continuation of conference, Pres. [Stephen L.] Chipman presiding. Pres. Jos. F. Smith was the speaker for the afternoon. Topics treated. Inasmuch as we are united in sustaining the authority of the priesthood, we shall have strength and continue to stand and not fall. He had not sought or desired any position in the church, only as God had called him to act. Could say the same of his brethren of the Twelve. The church is built upon the foundation of the truth, and we must acknowledge Jesus Christ as the savior of the world. Testified that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God. He loved Brigham Young, who fulfilled his mission, and he (J. F. S.) was a witness of it. Testified that Jno. Taylor was a man of God and held the keys of the kingdom. Was intimately connected with Wilford Woodruff and knew him to be a man of God. Bore testimony to the divine commission of Lorenzo Snow in the accomplishment of the mission given him. This is the Lord’s work and he will bring it off victorious. Admonished the saints to cherish the gospel and the love of the truth in their hearts as above and beyond all price.

Pres. Anthon H. Lund. Topics treated. Voting for the general authorities of the church. The patriarchal office. The blessings and promises of Jacob conferred upon his 12 sons [are] now being fulfilled. Free agency of man.

[Thursday, 31 October 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. I came in a few moments late, just as Apostle Woodruff concluded the reading of a letter from Apostle Lyman, Liverpool. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Brigham Young, Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, Hyrum M. Smith, and Pat. John Smith, and Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk.

The clerk read a letter from Apostle Lyman, in which he [p.347] referred feelingly to the death of the late President Lorenzo Snow. A letter was read from Bp. Moroni Ward of Washakie Ward, relating to Bp. [Amos R.] Wright’s mission to the Wind River Indians. He said that an effort is being made to get an Indian with his wife to accompany the bishop on his errand, and would doubtless be successful, provided, however, that a pony be furnished for his use. A letter from Pres. Wm. Budge brought the information that the total expense of the mission to the Wind River Agency would be as follows, to wit:

Outfit for Bp. Wright 285
Debts and home expenses of Bp. Wright 300
total $585
1 Indian pony.  

Upon motion the above amount was appropriated for the purpose named, with the understanding also that a pony should be furnished by the church.

A letter addressed to the council from Elder Chas. H. Wilkins was read. He informed the brethren that there was ample room for a large number of settlers at Deseret and expressed the hope that an influence would be used to have home-seekers go to that part of the country. The matter was referred to Apostle Woodruff.

The clerk read a letter from Pres. Ben. E. Rich, in which he referred to a conversation with Pres. Jos. F. Smith in relation to making an effort to plant a small colony of our people in Alabama with converts from that section of the country and from the southern states. The information gleaned from the letter made it appear that a movement of this kind would be of doubtful success. After some discussion it was moved that “we deem it imprudent and inadvisable to colonize our people in the southern states at the present time, and that those who desire to emigrate, and are in circumstances to do so, should be encouraged to go to some of our new settlements.” Carried.

Apostle Woodruff reported that Bp. Wm. Mendenhall of Mound Valley was sustained as 2nd counselor to Pres. [Lewis S.] Pond at the last stake conference held in Bannock Stake. Apostle Clawson called the attention of the council to the fact that at a previous meeting the question of again dividing the Salt Lake Stake was proposed, that a committee consisting of Apostles Grant and [p.348] Clawson was appointed to investigate the propriety of such action and report to the council, that at a later date the committee made verbal report and recommended the division, that owing to other pressing business before the meeting further discussion and action were deferred. Apostle Clawson now suggested that the matter be called up and disposed of, and remarked that if the brethren were favorable to the division, action should be taken at once so that the change might be effected at the beginning of the year.

Apostle Clawson then spoke to the question as follows, to wit: said that the Salt Lake Stake was first divided in Jan. 1900; that so far as he knew no argument could be brought and successfully maintained against the wisdom of said division; that in 1899 before the division the Salt Lake Stake paid $208,172.26 in tithing and in 1900 after the division $206,863.53; the Granite Stake paid in 1899 $48,463.92 and in 1900 $54,646.09; the Jordan Stake paid in 1899 $30,297.64 and in 1900 $30,506.63, showing an increase in the two new stakes; that the present population of the Salt Lake Stake is 22,890 with 28 wards, of the Granite Stake, 9515 with 14 wards, and of the Jordan Stake, 6840 with 12 wards; that if the Salt Lake Stake were again divided by Main Street (that being the line suggested), in the east Salt Lake Stake there would be 13 wards with a population of 10,459, and in the west Salt Lake Stake there would be 15 wards with a population of 12,441; that the Salt Lake Stake as divided would then constitute two of the largest stakes in Zion; that the division line would be imaginary so far as dividing the people in sentiment and faith is concerned, but a very substantial line so far as bringing the presidency of the stake and the people close together; that a large number of the brethren and sisters, whose talents are in some degree lost to the church, would be brought into active service; that the temple block should be reserved and held subject to the control of the First Presidency; that conjoint meetings of the two stakes should be held in the tabernacle every Sabbath afternoon, each presidency presiding alternately. After setting forth his views, Apostle Clawson said that he was himself very much in favor of the division and hoped the council would take favorable action.

Apostle Jno. H. Smith moved that the Salt Lake Stake be divided upon the lines suggested. Carried by unanimous vote. [p.349] While no formal action was taken, it seemed to be the mind of the brethren that the present stake authorities be released and two new presidencies installed. Pres. Smith asked the brethren to come to the next meeting prepared to suggest names of those who would be suitable for presiding officers.

“Doxology.” Benediction by Apostle Hyrum M. Smith.

[Tuesday, 5 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. I spent the day at the President’s office, and during the afternoon Pres. Jno. R. Winder called in and I went over very carefully with him the financial reports (which are all duly recorded) that I prepared for the benefit of the church during Pres. Lorenzo Snow’s presidency. He expressed himself as being very much interested and pleased with them and thought they were of great value to the church.

[Thursday, 7 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and Jno. Smith, patriarch, and Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk; also Apostle Hyrnm M. Smith. Song, “I Know That My Redeemer Lives.” Apostle Woodruff was mouth in prayer, and Apostle Smoot in the circle. Song, “The God That Others Worship.”

The clerk read a letter from Apostle Heber J. Grant, dated from Yokohama, Oct. 14th, 1901. He said among other things that the news of Pres. Snow’s death came to them as a great surprise and caused them to shed tears when they realized that they would meet him no more in this life. He and his companions held a little memorial service during the funeral of President Snow. Referring to the Japanese Mission, said that he had accomplished but little in learning the language, but had been very busy in defending the principles of the gospel. Felt that the Book of Mormon should be translated into the Japanese tongue and recommended that steps be taken to that end at once. He expressed a wish that his wife, Augusta, be permitted to come to him, saying that he believed she would be as efficient in giving him the assistance he needed in learning the language as an elder.

[p. 350] After some discussion Apostle Clawson moved that the council “do not deem it wise and proper that the Book of Mormon be translated into the Japanese language at the present time, but that the elders should more particularly resort to the translation of tracts, and our articles of faith; and that Apostle Grant shall have the privilege of sending for his wife.” The motion was amended to read that he shall have the privilege of sending for his wife at the end of a year from his departure from home, if he then feels this step would be desirable, and with the further understanding that he shall bear her expenses. Carried by unanimous vote.

Patriarch Jno. Smith asked the question as to whether there was any law or rule in the church forbidding cousins to intermarry. The answer was “no,” and that the authorities at the temple do not go behind the certificates or licenses issued by the county clerks.

Apostle Clawson reported his recent visit to the Summit Stake Conference (last Sunday and Monday) and said that he found in that stake a spirit of improvement, growth, and progress. At the priesthood meeting on Saturday, when the brethren who kept the word of wisdom and paid tithing were asked to arise, all present—about 100—arose. He knew of no other stake, he said, that could stand such a test as this—and yet Summit Stake but recently stood at the foot of the class. Better still, Pres. Moses Taylor reported at that meeting that all the officers of the stake—about 400 in number—observed these laws of God. Apostle Clawson further reported that three wards adjacent to Kamas Ward, and belonging to the Wasatch Stake, namely, Woodland—217 souls, Francis—181, Bench Creek—109, total 507 souls, were attached to the Summit Stake. The particular reason for this change was the fact that quarterly conferences would now alternate between Kamas and Coalville, thus bringing to these people better opportunities for attending these important gatherings.

Apostle Woodruff reported his visit to the Jordan Stake, Nov. 3 and 4, when the organization of the stake presidency was completed and now stands: Hyrum Goff, president; Jas. Jensen, 1st counselor; and J. W. W. Fitzgerald, 2nd counselor. Apostle Reed Smoot reported the reorganization of the Moroni Ward, North San Pete Stake, with Orlando Bradley, bishop, and Jabez Fox, Jr., 1st counselor, and Jas. M. Christensen, 2nd counselor.

Apostle Jno. H. Smith reported the visit of himself and Apostle [p.351] Hyrum M. Smith to the Woodruff Stake Conference held at Randolph. Conditions there were favorable. The saints of Randolph are building a commodious meeting house and have already expended $6000 bringing it to the square. It was decided by unanimous vote that [Robert Baxter] the father of stake president,  Jno. M. Baxter, be ordained a patriarch, also Oliver Huntington.

Geo. Teasdale reported his visit to and attendance at the Fremont Stake Conference. While Thos. E. Bassett, who is now in charge, is doing a good work, the stake should be reorganized, he thought, without further delay.

Upon motion $500 was appropriated to assist the saints of the Hunter Ward to complete their meeting house. The ward with a population of about 29 families has already spent in the neighborhood of $3000, and in view of this the appropriation found ready endorsement.

It was decided that at the special conference of the church to be held Nov. 10th, 1901, the voting by the priesthood should be done in quorum capacity. It was also decided that all officers in the auxiliary associations, both in stakes and wards, could justly claim a blessing and should, therefore, be set apart to their various callings. Benediction by Pres. Anthon H. Lund.

[Thursday, 14 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Matthias F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and Jno. Smith, patriarch, with Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk; also H. M. Smith. Song, “Glorious Things Are Sung of Zion.” Apostle Clawson was mouth in prayer, and Pres. A. H. Lund at the altar. Song, “God Moves in a Mysterious Way His Wonders to Perform.”

Stake conference appointments: Granite, Apostle[s] Teasdale and Clawson; Nebo, Apostles Smoot and Cowley; visit to the southern stakes, Apostles Woodruff and Hyrum M. Smith.

The clerk read two interesting letters from Apostle Francis M. Lyman. Also a letter [was read] from Don C. Driggs, pres. Teton Stake, who said that Jno. D. Killpack, his counselor, had got into straitened circumstances through the purchase of a ranch. He was a very useful man but unless something was done for him he would [p.352] doubtless have to leave the stake. All he asked was a loan of $500. I moved that the said amount be loaned to him. Carried.

A question arose as to the distribution of the 10% allowed bishops for the handling of tithes in the stakes of Zion, and it was decided by unanimous vote that the distribution be made by the presidency of each stake, associated with the bishops.

Pres. Smith directed attention to the necessity of taking some steps, looking to the revision and publication of the Book of Mormon in the Hawaiian language, and also suggested that the Book of Mormon be published in the Tahitian language as soon as someone was found who could do this work properly. The views of Pres. Smith were adopted by unanimous vote.

In accordance with Pres. Smith’s wish as expressed at a former meeting, some names were submitted for officers in the two new stakes to be created out of the Salt Lake Stake, and after brief discussion the matter was referred to the First Presidency, with a list of the names, to report at the next meeting.

Pres. Smith spoke of the interest held by the trustee-in-trust in the Utah Light and Power Co., amounting in round numbers to $215,000 in prior lien bonds, and $745,000 in preferred stock, and also a number of consolidated bonds with a large block of common stock. The prior lien bonds are worth their face value but the other holdings could not be realized upon at present. The business, he said, is very risky, it being subject to serious loss by the elements and also to ruinous competition. It had already come to be a question as to the wisdom of selling out. He desired the brethren to give the matter attention that they might be prepared to act upon the same at our next meeting. Benediction by Apostle Jno. H. Smith.

[Monday, 18 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild. 11 a.m. Having completed the statement of assets and liabilities of the church, showing the financial condition thereof at the beginning of Pres. Jos F. Smith’s administration, and also showing incidentally what had been accomplished during Pres. Lorenzo Snow’s incumbency in office during the past three years of his life, I submitted the same to the First Presidency, going carefully over every detail. Apostle Reed Smoot, the other member of the auditing committee, was at his home in Provo.

In order that the reader may have a clear idea of conditions that prevailed in Feb. 1899 (when the first report was made) and also the conditions that now prevail, I record below a recapitulation of each report:

Recapitulation of Report Dated Feb. 18, 1899
Assets Active Silent
Cash on hand 2,400.00  
Real estate 815,050.00 616,866.78
Bank and mercantile stocks and bonds 974,437.50 204,200.00
Bills receivable and accounts 88,632.28 85,000.00
total 1,880,519.78 906,066.78
Liabilites Direct Contingent
Church bonds, series A 499,200.00  
Church bonds, series B 164,100.00  
Bills payable, sundry notes 1,006,433.70  
Pioneer Elec. Power Co. int. on bonds 80,068.25  
Deseret News Co.’s note at Zion’s S[avings] Bk. 48,089.43  
Saltair Beach Co.’s note, ch. endorsement   3,954.29
H. J. Grant et al., ch. endorsement   65,000.00
Pioneer Elec. Power Co. bonds guaranteed by the church   1,500,000.00
total $1,797,891.38 $1,568,954.29
Excess of assets over liabilities $82,628.40  
Recapitulation of Report Dated Nov. 1, 1901
Assets Active Silent
Cash on hand 92,101.62  
Real estate 928,700.00 601,267.66
Bank, railroad, and mercantile stocks and bonds 955,780.00  
Bills receivable and accounts 15,817.78 50,000.00
total $1,992,399.40 $651,267.66
[p.354]    
Liabilities
Church bonds 850,600.00  
Bills payable, sundry notes 255,208.35  
Due sundry persons 2,063.30  
Liverpool office, acct. drafts 1,325.93  
Jackson County Temple donation 1,410.00  
  $1,110,607.58  
Excess of assets over liabilities 881,791.82  
Total net reduction of contingent liabilities since Feb. 18, 1899 $1,568,954.29  
The following table is drawn from the two reports:
Total net excess of active assets Feb. 18, [18]99   82,628.40
Active assets, Feb. 18, 1899 1,880,519.78  
Active assets, Nov. 1, 1901 1,992,399.40  
Total net increase in active assets   111,879.62
Direct liabilities, Feb. 18, 1899 1,797,891.38  
Direct liabilities, Nov. 1, 1901 1,110,607.58  
Total net reduction in liabilities   687,283.80
Total net excess of active assets, Nov. 1, 1901   $881,791.82

The report, which covered eleven sheets of extra large ledger paper, was listened to with rapt attention by the First Presidency, who were greatly surprised and gratified with the excellent showing made and marvelled at what had been accomplished in so short a time by Pres. Lorenzo Snow under the special blessing of the Lord: for it will be seen that the assets of the church had not only increased in value to the extent of $111,879.62, but that the church indebtedness had been decreased $687,283.80. In addition to this, it will also be seen that the contingent indebtedness of Feb. 18, 1899, amounting to $1,568,954.29, had been entirely wiped out, while the net assets of the church jumped from $82,628.40 in Feb. [p.355] 1899 to $881,791.82. And such was the glorious work accomplished by Pres. Lorenzo Snow and the saints under divine favor in the short period of three years. The reason I use the word saints is this: the saints listened to the voice of counsel in respect to the payment of their tithes and thus opened up the way, through the wise and prudent management of affairs, for substantial and permanent relief to the church.

The report of the auditing committee, as above set forth in totals, will be officially approved by the Presidency when Apostle Reed Smoot can be present, sometime during the week. It was moved that I be authorized to have a book bound at the Deseret News office, specially adapted for the recording of this and the previous statement of assets and liabilities and for other similar reports to be furnished annually. Carried by unanimous vote.

At this point I felt it my duty as chairman of the auditing committee to make a further report, and said that the books in the President’s office were not up to date; that in proof of this, it needed only to be recited that the accounts had been kept open for many years, and no steps had been taken annually or semiannually, as is usually done, in order to obtain results and show the exact condition of affairs. I further represented that books when properly kept would always furnish the data for a statement of assets and liabilities, but in the present case, I could not rely upon the books of the trustee-in-trust, but was obliged to search through other channels for much valuable information. In view of the facts set forth, I recommended that the books be closed and a new set be opened with the opening of the year 1902 and that someone be appointed by the Presidency, other than those now in charge, to direct just how this shall be done and how the accounts shall be kept in the future, with the idea always in view that the books shall be closed annually.

Pres. Smith said that the recommendation was worthy of the most serious consideration and would be taken under advisement.

[Tuesday, 19 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. In order that the Presidency might have the facts before them, I have been working assiduously all day and into the night (to 11 p.m.) to obtain what would be the closing entries in the trustee-in-trust’s books. My guide was the trial [p.356] balance taken Nov. 1, 1901. Taking all the accounts as scattered through the ledger showing enormous balances, I closed one into another and obtained the following results:

Debits
Expense acct. 5,612,281.85
Loss and gain 995,975.21
Resources:  
Nevada ranch acct. 50,000.00
Bonds acct. 176,000.00
Mdse. orders $43.00
Scrip orders 582.10
Capital stocks 155,780.00
Bills rec. sundry notes 13,121.20
Deseret News building acct. 238,567.62
Utah Sugar cap. stock 315,000.00
Real estate 49,307.23
Canada lands 35,142.63
Carrington lot acct. 6,000.00
Monroe ranch acct. 23,533.19
Inland Crystal Salt Co. cap. stock 19,000.00
Personal accts. 1,653.81
Mons Peterson’s ranch 5,000.00
Z.C.M.I. 117.67
Cash 45,646.18
total   7,743,051.69
   

Credits

Revenue acct. (including and comprehending cash and produce tithing, dividends, rents, interest recd., &c. 6,635,998.96
Liabilities:  
Bills payable, sundry notes 257,638.35
Church bonds 844,414.72
Amt. due sundry persons 2,263.73
Jackson County Temple donation 1,410.00
Liverpool office, acct. drafts 1,325.93
  $7,743,051.69

I then closed loss and gain, and expense accts. into revenue [p.357] acct., and obtained as the final closing entries, the following results:

Debts
Balance Account
Assets (as above) $1,134,794.63
Credits
Liabilities (as above) 1,107,052.73
Surplus 27,741.90
total  $1,134,794.63

It will be seen from the above showing, as set forth in the books of the trustee-in-trust, that if the assets were turned into cash and the liabilities paid off, the church would have a surplus of $27,741.90, whereas the report furnished by the auditing committee shows that the assets of the church exceed the liabilities by $881,791.82. The above statement will be submitted to the First Presidency at the earliest possible moment for their consideration, and I hope favorable action, looking to the closing up of the present books and the opening of a new set.

[Thursday, 21 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. It is an exceptionally mild and dry fall, and the usual moisture at this time of year has not fallen.

11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: Presidents Jos. F. Smith, Jno. R. Winder, and Anthon H. Lund, and Apostles Brigham Young (who is in feeble health), Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, Patriarch Jno. Smith, and Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “I Know That My Redeemer Lives.” Apostle Young was mouth in prayer, and Apostle Taylor in the circle. Song, “Hark, the Song of Jubilee.”

Conference appointments: Box Elder, Pres. Jos. F. Smith and Apostle Smoot; Benson, Apostle Jno. H. Smith and M. F. Cowley; Millard, Apostle Clawson. Apostle Teasdale reported that the resignation of Bp. [William H.] Warner of Nephi had been tendered and accepted and that the bishopric there should now be reorganized. He was authorized to attend to this matter, and upon motion of Apostle Smoot it was decided that Bp. Warner be ordained a patriarch.

[p. 358] The clerk read a letter from Apostle Taylor, Canada, dated Nov. 14th, reporting the organization of the Raymond Ward with Elder Wm. J. Knight as bishop. He also said that the saints were prospering in that part of the vineyard. The clerk read a letter from the presidency of the Alberta Stake, giving official notice of the organization of Raymond Ward. I moved the approval of Apostle Taylor’s action. Carried.

A letter from Pres. Jas. Steele of Bingham Stake was read. He reported that Bp. Jas. Castle of Palisade Ward had been released and Elder Jacob Jacobson chosen to succeed him, subject to the approval of the council. The action of Pres. Steele was approved and the clerk instructed to write him that the new bishop would be set apart, or rather ordained, at the next quarterly conference at the Bingham Stake.

Apostle Jno. H. Smith suggested that inasmuch as Brother Jno. Smith, the patriarch, is now associated with us that he ought to take up a special labor with the patriarchs of the church and, as far as he could, to see that they were doing their duty and keeping a proper record of their blessings. Pres. Smith remarked that he wanted Brother Jno. Smith also to visit the stake conferences.

Apostle Reed Smoot called attention to a case where a certain brother in administering the ordinance of baptism did not stand in the water, contrary to the instructions given in the Book of Covenants, and asked if that mode of baptism had the sanction of the church. The answer was emphatically “no,” and that it was not proper.

The clerk read a long letter from Brother Ammon Tenney, who is laboring among the Mexicans in Mexico. He reported good success, but said that the natives of that country were quite loose in their morals and were guilty, more or less, of the sin of adultery—a sin, owing to custom and tradition, that was looked upon as a light thing. He was seeking, he said, to impress them with the enormity of it. He needed five more elders. Benediction by Apostle Teasdale.

4 p.m. Reception given by stake counselor, Jas. R. Miller, at his palatial residence, Mill Creek, to the bishopric[s] of the wards of the Granite Stake and their wives. There were about 120 present. Among the number were the First Presidency, and Apostles Taylor, myself, and wives. It was an extremely sociable affair. [p.359] A hot supper was served at 4:30 p.m. and after supper the following program was carried out:

Program
Remarks, Pres. Jno. R. Winder. He said that it was 40 years since he came to reside in the Mill Creek Ward. Reuben Miller was bishop at that time. He looked upon him as a strong man. He left some faithful sons, and among them, Brother Jas. R. Miller. Spoke of his early experiences in Mill Creek. Was delighted with this occasion and thought it a grand thing to get the bishops together. Much good will result.

Remarks, Apostle Jno. W. Taylor. He said that he was pleased to be present and had reflected upon the many blessings we enjoy. We are in good health, have had an abundance of food, have the holy priesthood in our midst—prophets, seers, and revelators, and we have our wives sealed to us for eternity. Felt to bless Brother Miller and all present. Invoked the special blessing of the Lord upon Pres. Smith.

Remarks, Pres. A. H. Lund. He thought the bishops should follow the good example of Brother Miller in reference to the people of their wards and much good would result. Related several incidents illustrating the advantages arising from faithfulness.

Remarks, Pres. Jos. F. Smith. He expressed pleasure and satisfaction in being present and spoke in a very delightful strain upon the important subject of marriage and urged the bishops to see to it that the young people in their wards entered into these sacred relations. No man or woman could enter into a fullness of exaltation and glory outside of the marriage covenant. Spoke very strongly and forcibly upon the evil of indebtedness and counseled the bishops and counselors present who are financially involved to free themselves at the earliest possible moment from every such obligation. If you wish to get out of debt, pay your tithing. I prophesy that the man who will do this will be able to free himself sooner than he could otherwise do. When we again meet at Brother Miller’s in this capacity, I trust that Pres. [Frank Y.] Taylor will be able to report that the table has been cleared from all indebtedness. There is no more important and responsible calling [in] the church than that of a bishop. The occasion was pronounced a great success, and after the serving of lemonade, the company dispersed.

[p. 360] [Wednesday, 27 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cool. At 10 a.m. I attended a meeting of the board of directors of the Utah [Light] and Power Co. and at 5 p.m. I attended a meeting of the general board of the Y.M.M.I.A.

During the afternoon I went to see an invention by Chas. Kraft. It consists of a telephone combination whereby a person using the phone deposits a nickel in the slot and receives two tickets, one, when presented with 20c, good for 25c worth of goods, and the other, when presented with 45c, good for 50 cts. worth of streetcar tickets: thus for every 75c [70c] expended, he would get in return free telephone service and 80c [75c] of value. It looks like a good thing.

[Thursday, 28 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and mild; very beautiful day. Thanksgiving day. I spent the day quietly at home and in the afternoon I took the folks out for a drive.

[Friday, 29 November 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and pleasant. 10 a.m. Special meeting at the President’s office. President: the First Presidency, and Apostles  Jno. H. Smith, Jno. W. Taylor, Matthias F. Cowley, and Rudger Clawson, and Robert Campbell, sec. Utah Light and Power Co.

Pres. Smith stated that the object of the meeting was to consider the wisdom and propriety of sealing the church’s interest in the Utah Light and Power Co. There is a necessity, he said, of expending at once about $500,000 to secure more water power with which to maintain the prestige of the business. Aside from this it is in some respects a hazardous and unsatisfactory enterprise.

R. S. Campbell, the secretary, made a brief statement explaining conditions, and said among other things that the co. is now up to the limit, and must have more power. The improvements needed would doubtless cost $500,000, while the church on the other hand could probably get $450,000 for its interest.

Pres. Jno. Winder and Apostle Taylor expressed themselves as being in favor of selling. Apostle Jno. H. Smith thought the matter worthy of the deepest consideration. After further discussion the [p.361] question was taken under advisement for one week, at which time it was thought that a larger number of the brethren would be in attendance.

[Thursday, 5 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and mild. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Brigham Young, J. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and Patriarch Jno. Smith, with Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “See How the Morning Sun.” Prayer by Pres. Smith, and Apostle Merrill mouth in the circle. Song, “Glory to God on High.”

Apostle Reed Smoot reported that Brother [James E.] Hall was stirring up considerable excitement in the Utah Stake in reference to the gift of healing, which he claimed he was able to exercise in a miraculous manner. In his (Brother Smoot’s) judgment a spirit of darkness was actuating and influencing Brother Hall, and should be rebuked. Apostle Smoot was directed by the council to see the president of the Utah Stake and instruct him to investigate the matter and take such action as the facts will warrant.

Conference appointments: North San Pete, Apostles Teasdale and Smoot; Pocatello, Apostles Jno. H. Smith and Rudger Clawson. The clerk read a letter from Pres. Wm. A. Hyde of the Pocatello Stake, recommending the release of Bp. [Carl J.] Cannon of Pocatello on account of bodily infirmities and the reorganization of the bishopric there. He recommended Smith Woolley to succeed Bp. Cannon. The letter was referred to the visiting apostles with power to act.

A letter from Geo. Reynolds, sec. general church board of education, was read by the clerk. He notified the council of the action of the board of education, who recommended that the church be asked to appropriate $75,950 for church school purposes for the school year 1901-1902 and that the charge of $28,209 against the board of education on the books of the trustee-in-trust be cancelled by an appropriation. The recommendations were approved by unanimous vote.

The clerk read an interesting letter from Apostles Woodruff and Hyrum M. Smith, who are visiting some of the southern stakes. They reported the reorganization of several wards, as follows, to [p.362] wit: Parowan with Morgan Richards, Jr., as bishop; Kanarra with Jos. S. Berry, bishop; Cedar with Henry W. Lunt, bishop; Mesquite (new), Wm. E. Abbott, bishop; Overton with Jno. M. Bunker, bishop. They also gave a good report of the St. George Stake and recommended that further substantial assistance be given the presidency of that stake, as they would be required to give almost their entire time to church duties. The above changes were approved by unanimous vote, and the matter of compensation was referred to the First Presidency for favorable action.

A letter from Apostle Francis M. Lyman was read. He reported that the translation of the Book of Mormon in the German language, authorized by the Presidency, was in progress. He also called attention to the necessity of a new edition of the hymn book and asked for instructions. The matter was referred to the Presidency for action.

The clerk read a communication from Geo. Reynolds and Jas. E. Talmage, committee on museum building. The necessity of a new building or home for the Deseret Museum was pointed out, and they suggested that a piece of land suitable for such purpose be given them on block 88 (the tithing office block). It was moved that the matter be referred to a special committee to be appointed by Pres. Smith. Pres. Smith appointed A. H. Lund, J. H. Smith, and Geo. Reynolds as said committee.

Attention was called to the necessity at an early day of the reorganization of the presidency of the San Juan Stake. Pres. Smith felt that some of the apostles should go to that stake and carefully look over the ground before the appointment of a new president was made. The idea was concurred in.

Apostle Geo. Teasdale reported the reorganization of the bishopric of Nephi 1st Ward with David Pettigrew as bishop to succeed Bp. [William H.] Warner. Apostle Jno. H. Smith reported his visit to the Bear Lake Stake and said that Oliver H. Budge was sustained as stake supt. of Y.M.M.I.A. to succeed Jas. H. Hart. The change was made on account of some political differences existing between Pres. Wm. Budge and Elder Hart. He also reported the ordination of Jas. H. Hart and Jas. U. Stuki as patriarchs. Apostle Clawson reported the ordination of Jas. Fisher and August Beckstrand of Meadow as patriarchs at the last conference in the Millard Stake.

[p. 363] The clerk read a letter from Elder E. O. Bean, who had written a play entitled “Corianton,” based upon Book of Mormon history. He desired the Presidency and Twelve and a select few as they might name to give a reading of the play at the Beehive House. This suggestion was not in harmony with the feelings of the brethren. They did not question his right and privilege to write a play, but felt that it should stand on its merits when placed upon the stage and should not come to the public hedged about by church influence.

Pres. Smith desired, he said, to bring before the meeting a very important question for consideration. It was no less than the selling of our interest in the Utah Light and Power Co. Our holdings there consist of 174 consolidated bonds, 215 prior lien bonds, 29,800 shares preferred stock, 20,512 shares common stock; total face value of bonds $302,000; total face value of stocks $1,258,200; grand total $1,660,200.00. Notwithstanding these large figures, the present market value of our holdings is about $215,000.00

Pres. Jno. R. Winder, director of the Utah Light and Power Co., also vice president and chairman of the executive committee, was called upon for his views. He said that the company had reached the end of the rope so far as power is concerned. They must have more power, and that would mean the expenditure of about $500,000, of which the church would have to raise $175,000. With this expenditure and all that the church had already expended, under the most favorable circumstances, the most the church could expect in return for a number of years to come would be $31,000 a year. He thought that our holdings in the power co. would probably bring $450,000. Taking as favorable a view as we might, it was ever a very risky business—subject always to serious losses by the elements and fierce competition, while electric light companies were invariably looked upon as robbers by their patrons. This because the light is measured out through a meter and the consumer never fails to question its accuracy. He was in favor, he said, of selling.

Apostle Clawson, director, coincided with the views expressed and said that if the trustee-in-trust could get $450,000 for our interest, he was in favor of selling. He called attention to the fact that while under the most favorable circumstances (as explained [p. 364]by Pres. Winder) we could only hope to get a revenue of $31,000 a year, the interest on $450,000, if we could get that amount by selling, would amount to $27,000 at 6%, and said that he did not think the church could afford to take the risks and suffer from the anxiety attendant upon such enterprises for $4000 a year, although on the other hand our control of the power co. gives the church business prestige. In view of all the facts, he was in favor of selling.

Apostle Smoot spoke to the question and expressed himself as strongly in favor of selling for the reasons already set forth. Apostle Jno. W. Taylor moved that we sell our holdings in the Utah Light and Power Co. at such figures as the Presidency may determine upon and as shall be satisfactory to them. Carried by unanimous vote. Benediction by Apostle Smoot.

[Wednesday, 11 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cold. 3 p.m. Gathering in the Celestial Room of the Salt Lake Temple in honor of Pres. Jno. R. Winder upon the eightieth anniversary of his birth. Present: the First Presidency, myself, and a large number of the temple workers.

Pres. Jno. R. Winder said in response that he appreciated this manifestation of love and esteem on the part of his brethren and sisters and fellow-laborers. Felt that in the house of the Lord we were nearer heaven than in any other place. Spoke of obedience and said that in the kingdom of heaven we would be willing to answer every call. In the 50 years of his connection with the church, he did not remember a single instance where he failed to respond to the voice of the priesthood. Oct. 10, 1898, Pres. Lorenzo Snow and the apostles were at his house. The president said among other things that he (Brother Jno. R. Winder) would do a greater work in the future than he had ever done before and would be more greatly honored by his brethren and sisters.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith was the next speaker and said in substance, he was gratified and pleased that the temple workers had recognized the worth and faithfulness of Pres. Winder by giving him this surprise. He believed that he had secured the love and esteem of every worker in the temple. Felt that it was a great thing to say of any man that he had continually grown in the affection of his brethren and sisters. Because of his humility and faithfulness in part (perhaps there are also other reasons) he was chosen as one [p.365] of my counselors. In the selection of my counselors I thought over the matter night and day and prayed earnestly to the Lord. I asked him who his choice was, and over and over again the names of Jno. R. Winder and Anthon H. Lund came to my mind. I had thought of other brethren. Brother Rudger here was in my mind. I looked upon him as a martyr, who had faced death for the cause of truth unflinchingly and bravely. I also regarded him as a man of ability. He has my love and esteem. I loved this my young brother and felt to honor him. Pres. Snow had confidence in him and felt to honor him. I also felt to honor him and desired that he should be one of the three, but the Spirit of the Lord whispered that it should be otherwise. Spoke of the mission of Joseph Smith, the prophet, and said that he held the keys to the Celestial Kingdom and not a single soul of this dispensation could enter there without his permission or sanction. Referring to the judgment that would be pronounced upon the righteous, said that the atoning blood of Christ would remit their sins, which would be blotted out of the book of life and out of their minds and would no more come up in remembrance before them.

[Thursday, 12 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Clear and cold. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, Jno. Smith, the patriarch, and G. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “Prayer Is the Soul’s Sincere Desire.” Pat. Jno. Smith was mouth in prayer, and Pres. Jno. R. Winder in the circle. Song, “Praise to the Man.”

Stake conference appointments: Morgan, the First Presidency and Apostle Clawson; Salt Lake Stake, Apostles Jno. H. Smith and Geo. Teasdale. The clerk read a letter from Elder D. T. Miller, who recommended the following brethren to act as a committee on the translation [publication] of the Book of Mormon in the Tahitian language: W[illiam] H. Chamberlin, David Neff, Mark [Frank] Cutler, and Eugene Cannon. The recommendation was adopted with the addition of the name of D. T. Miller.

A letter from Jas. Paxman of the Juab Stake was read. He said that the bishop of Levan, Brother N. P. Rasmussen, had sent in his resignation on account of failing health. He further said that Bp. [p.366] Rasmussen was a good man and had been a faithful bishop. The resignation was accepted and Apostle Teasdale appointed to effect a reorganization.

The clerk read a letter from ex-bishop Saml. F. Atwood of Kamas, in which he claimed that he had been misrepresented to Pres. Jos. F. Smith. One of the charges was that he had expressed disbelief in the visitation of the Father and Son to Joseph Smith, the prophet, and this, he said, was false. He denied the allegation. Pres. Smith remarked that he had been credibly informed that Bishop Atwood had made this remark, namely, that “God Almighty had bigger business to attend to than to visit the boy Joseph.” However, the letter was referred to Pres. Moses Taylor of the Summit Stake for investigation and such proper action as may be necessary.

The clerk read a letter from Elder Jas. E. Hall. He claimed that his rights in the church were being abridged by the presidency of the Utah Stake, in so far as they refused him the privilege to go and administer to the sick when sent for. Several letters were read in which the parties testified to the great good that was being accomplished by Brother Hall in his administrations. The brethren in discussing this matter took the view that it was not so much the question of Brother Hall’s administering to the sick as the holding of meetings and working up unnecessary excitement. The whole matter was referred to the Presidency of the Utah Stake with power to act.

I was then called upon as chairman of the auditing committee to report present condition of the church financially. I thereupon read the statement of assets and liabilities of the church, Nov. 1, 1901 (see pages 215 and 216 this book) [i.e., pp. 353-54] showing a surplus of assets over liabilities of $881,791.29, and the statement of assets and liabilities at the Presiding Bishop’s office, showing a surplus of $99,438.85 (see pages 233-234 this book) [i.e., in Clawson diary, 5 December 1901]. The reading was listened to with great attention, and at the conclusion upon motion of Apostle Jno. H. Smith the reports were approved and ordered to be recorded in a book specially adapted for the purpose.

At this point I stated that the books of the trustee-in-trust at the President’s office were not up to date and in proof of  same submitted a report showing the status of the accounts Oct. 1, 1901, [p.367] had the books been closed at that time. The following results were shown: total assets $1,134,794.63; total liabilities $1,107,052.73; excess of assets over liabilities $27,741.90. I further stated that if the books had been properly kept, they would have shown the following results: total assets $1,992,399.40; total liabilities $1,110,607.58; excess of assets over liabilities $881,791.82. In view of the fact that the books were so inaccurate, I recommended that they be closed up at the end of the year and a new set opened.

It was moved that the recommendation be adopted and that the closing and opening entries be made under the direction of Apostle Clawson, chairman of the auditing committee, and that the methods employed in keeping the accounts be subject to the watch-care and approval of said chairman. Carried by unanimous vote. The details of report above referred to will be found on pages 218 and 219 of this book [i.e., pp. 356-57].

I also submitted a statement showing the indebtedness of the church, Oct. 1, 1898, and Nov, 1, 1901, covering the period of Pres. Lorenzo Snow’s presidency, as follows in round numbers, to wit:

Church Indebtedness, Oct. 1, 1898
Bills payable, notes outstanding   1,819,724.08
Pioneer Electric Power Co. int. guaranteed   190,000.00
Amt. due on acct. Sterling Mining Co.   118,288.12
Amt. due H. B. Claffin and Co.   40,000.00
Total indebtedness Oct. 1, 1901 [1898]   2,168,012.20
Indebtedness Acquired Between the Periods of Oct. 1, 1898, and Nov. 1, 1901
Bills payable, notes 240,344.00  
Amt. due for cancellation of church guaranty on 1500 ($1000 ea.) Pioneer bonds 225,000.00  
Jackson Temple offerings 1,410.00  
Liabilities at P.B.O. 45,668.11 512,422.11
Indebtedness Guaranteed by the Church. Oct. 1, 1898
H. J. Grant’s note   65,000.00
1500 (1000 ea.) Pioneer Electric [p.368] Power Company bonds   1,500,000.00
Total indebtedness to Nov. 1, 1901 $2,680,434.31 $1,565,000.00
Less amt. paid on church indebtedness to Nov. 1, 1901   1,524,158.62
Total church indebtedness Nov. 1, 1901   $1,156,275.69
Indebtedness Nov. 1, 1901, Divided as Follows
Bills payable 255,208.35  
Church bonds 850,600.00  
Jackson Co. Temple off. 1,410.00  
Due sundry persons 2,063.30  
Liverpool office drafts 1,325.93  
Liabilities at P.B.O.  45,668.11  
total   $1,156,275.69
Total Direct and Contingent Indebtedness Paid to Nov. 1, 1901
Direct indebtedness   1,524,158.62
Contingent indebtedness   1,565,000.00
total   $3,089,158.[62]

Note: as to the contingent indebtedness, H. J. Grant’s note was paid by himself and the church guaranty for the payment of the 1500 ($1000) Pioneer Electric Power Co. bonds was cancelled and returned upon payment by the trustee-in-trust of $225,000 in cash and an agreement upon the part of the trustee-in-trust to pay $5000.00 a year for ten years in the event of the failure of the Utah Light and Power Co. to pay interest (or dividends) on their preferred stock. Upon motion the foregoing report was approved with instructions that it be carried to the proper record. Benediction by Pres. Anthon H. Lund.

[Sunday, 15 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and snowing. 7 a.m. Accompanying Presidents Jos. F. Smith and Anthon H. Lund, I left for Morgan City to attend the Morgan Stake Conference, arriving at 10 a.m. We were met at the depot by Stake Pres. Dan Heiner, who drove us at once to the stake tabernacle, which has just been completed and will be dedicated during the conference. The house presented [p.369] a chaste and beautiful appearance. The inside walls are papered with ingrain paper, and the building is seated with opera chairs. Ample arrangements have been made for the choir, and the stand for the authorities of the priesthood, with the pulpit, is neat and appropriate.

10 a.m. Meeting called to order by Stake Pres. Dan. Heiner. Apostle A. H. Lund. Topics treated. The performance of duty brings happiness. Worldly pleasures do not give real joy. Dwelt upon the subject of the gathering. Tithing.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith. Topics treated. Spoke in complimentary terms of the improvements made in completing the stake house. This is a house of the Lord and should be kept holy. A place should always be provided in this house for the children. Honesty. We might deceive our brethren but could not deceive the Lord. Tithing. The trial that came upon Abraham in being required to offer up his son to the Lord. Invoked the blessing of the Lord upon the saints. Word of wisdom.

[Thursday, 19 December 1901] 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, Jno. W. Taylor, Marriner W. Merrill, Matthias F. Cowley, Rudger Clawson, Jno. Smith, patriarch, and Geo. F. Gibbs, clerk. Song, “A Saint! And Is the Title Mine?” Apostle Teasdale was mouth in prayer, and Apostle Jno. H. Smith in the circle. Song, “Now, Let Us Rejoice in the Day of Salvation.”

Stake conference appointments: Hyrum, Apostle Merrill; Davis, Rudger Clawson; Malad, Apostle Taylor. Bp. [Lehi] Wright of Marsh Center, Pocatello Stake, sent in a request through Apostle Cowley, desiring to be released that he might move to Oregon. Apostle Cowley stated that the presidency of Pocatello Stake were willing to grant him a release. In view of this fact, it was decided to release him.

The clerk read an interesting letter from Apostle H. J. Grant [in Japan], in which he mentioned in approving terms the division of the Salt Lake Stake. Pres. Smith remarked that Heber had written to a number of people (to himself for one) of the division of said stake. He regretted this inasmuch as the stake had not been divided, and was a matter still under advisement.

[p. 370] It was stated by Pres. Smith that Elder Spencer Clawson had sent in a request for the return, if agreeable to the Presidency, of the 300 shares capital stock of the Spencer Clawson Dry Goods Co.—$30,000—held as collateral to secure his indebtedness to the church. It was explained that the stock has no present value. It was moved that the stock be returned. Carried by unanimous vote.

I drew attention to the fact that the council had already voted to divide the Salt Lake Stake [on] Jan. 1, 1902, and as the time was near at hand, the selection of presiding officers for the two new stakes should be made at once. Some of the brethren favored a postponement of the division for the present, namely, Apostle[s]  Jno. H. Smith, Geo. Teasdale, and Jno. W. Taylor, while Apostle Cowley and myself favored immediate action. It was finally decided to postpone. This action I very much regretted, as no doubt great good would result from the division. Benediction by Rudger Clawson.

[Sunday, 22 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. 7 a.m. Left for Kaysville to attend the Davis Stake Conference, arriving at 8:45 a.m.

2 p.m. Continuation of conference, Coun. Jos. H. Grant presiding. Stake Coun[selor] Jos. S. Clark was the first speaker. Topics. High councillors called to labor among the non-tithe-payers. Record day. Work for the dead.

Rudger Clawson. Topics treated. True greatness only to be found in the gospel. Life and character of the Prophet Joseph Smith and the authority held; not a soul of this generation would pass into the Celestial Kingdom without his sanction.

[Monday, 23 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and mild. 9:45 a.m. Left for Kaysville to attend the second day’s conference, arriving at 10:20 a.m.

10:30 a.m. Meeting called to order by Coun[selor]. Jos. H. Grant. Apostle Jno. W. Taylor. Topics treated. The evil of hypnotism and spiritualism. Sons of perdition.

[Thursday, 26 December 1901] Salt Lake City. Cloudy and cool. 11 a.m. Meeting at the temple. Present: the First Presidency, and Apostles Jno. H. Smith, Matthias [p.371] F. Cowley, Abraham O. Woodruff, Rudger Clawson, Reed Smoot, and Jno. Smith, the patriarch. Song, “Jesus Once of Humble Birth.” Apostle Woodruff was mouth in prayer, and Apostle Cowley in the circle. Song, “God Moves in a Mysterious Way.”

Conference appointments: Sevier, Apostles Cowley and Clawson. A letter from Pres. [William H.] Seegmiller of the Sevier Stake was read. He reported that there were two bishops to be ordained and expressed the hope that one or more of the apostles would be in attendance at the conference. The matter of ordaining the bishops was referred to the visiting apostles with power to act.

Pres. Jos. F. Smith informed the brethren that Pres. Brigham Young was at Fruitland sick. He was on his way to Mesa City, where he expected to spend the balance of the winter for his health. Pres. Smith further said that the condition of Brother Brigham was such that he ought to be near his brethren, where he could receive such attention as they could give. Upon motion Apostle Woodruff was delegated to go to Fruitland and bring him to Salt Lake, if his health would justify.

It was represented to the council that Brother Scipio A. Kenner, who is writing a short history of Utah, desired the Presidency to give the News a $400 guaranty for the publication and accept a $900 subscription list as security. Pres. Jno. R. Winder made a few remarks favoring the application. It was moved and carried that the guaranty be granted.

A letter from Chas. Kingston, counselor in the Woodruff Stake presidency, addressed to Apostle Jno. H. Smith, was read in relation to organizing some wards in the Woodruff Stake. The mater was referred to Apostle Smith with power to act.

Apostle Woodruff called attention to an appropriation made by Pres. Snow to the presidency of the Big Horn Stake, namely, $600 for Pres. Byron Sessions, and $300 for Bro. [Charles A.] Welsch, his counselor, for the year 1901. The matter, he said, through neglect had not been attended to. After some discussion it was decided upon suggestion of Pres. Smith that the compensation of the presidency of the Big Horn Stake be fixed at 600 per annum—$300 for the president and 150 each for his counselors—with a special appropriation to make good the promise of President Snow.

It was moved that the minutes of our meetings be read for [p.372] approval and adoption at each succeeding meeting, a practice that has not prevailed hitherto. Carried. Upon motion of Apostle Clawson, the hour of the meeting was changed from 11 a.m. to 10 a.m. Benediction by Apostle Jno. H. Smith. At the conclusion of the meeting the apostles met and decided that their meetings, hitherto held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. be discontinued, as it was thought that the quarterly conference of the Twelve in connection with any special meetings that might be called would answer the purpose.

Notes

1. Male priesthood leaders sometimes formed their own prayer circles outside those convened in temples for more socially oriented study groups.

2. Moses Thatcher had been ordained an apostle in 1879 but dropped from office in 1896 for political dissension, non-attendance at meetings, and ill health (including morphine addiction).