Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Fremont School
[p.1]Fremont School, February 19, 1903. This sandstone structure stood on the east side of 300 West between 100 and 200 South streets. It was designed by architect Henry Monheim, who was one of the architects responsible for the City and County Building. It was built in 1890 as the 14th District School and later renamed. After standing vacant for a number of years, the school was demolished in 1968. (Neg. 323.)

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Utah State Penitentiary
[p.2]The Utah State Penitentiary viewed from the northwest, November 17, 1903. A territorial prison was first erected on this site on 2100 South just above 1300 East in 1854‑55. The buildings in this photograph were demolished in the early 1950s, after a new correctional facility was constructed twenty miles south at Point of the Mountain. The prison property became Sugarhouse Park. (Neg. 656.)

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South Temple
[p.3]South Temple looking east from West Temple, December 10, 1903. Note the old Tithing Office and Deseret News building visible in the distance, as well as the old wooden gate at the south entrance to Temple Square. (Neg. 690.)

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Matthew Walker residence
[p.4]Matthew Walker residence, 1904. This newly completed home at 610 East South Temple was built for one of the Walker brothers who made their fortune as merchants and bankers. The mansion was later home to David Keith, then to several social clubs, including the Aviation Club and the University Club. Today it is used as an office building. (Neg. 1020.)

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St. Mary's Cathedral
[p.5]St. Mary’s Cathedral under construction, 1904. Ground was broken in 1899 on this site at 325 East South Temple and the building was ready for use in 1907. The new cathedral replaced the old St. Mary’s Cathedral on 200 East between South Temple and 100 South streets and in the 1920s was named Cathedral of the Madeleine. (Neg. 1021.)

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Lafayette School
[p.6]Lafayette School, 1904. Located on State Street above North Temple, this school burned down in 1922 and was replaced by a new building with the same name. Today a parking lot occupies the site. (Neg. 1153.)

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David Keith's carriage
[p.7]David Keith’s carriage, 1904. Keith made his fortune in the mines of Park City and subsequently built an elaborate mansion in Salt Lake City. In this view his driver waits in front of the Keith residence at South Temple and F Street. (Neg. 1236.)

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All Hallows College
[p.8]All Hallows College, 1904. Bishop Lawrence Scanlon established this Catholic school in 1881. After 1918, when the college ceased operation, the buildings became an armory for the Utah National Guard. The buildings were damaged by fire in 1941 and subsequently torn down. Plans to build a new armory on the same site at 200 South and 400 East never materialized. A supermarket occupies the property today. (Neg. 1260.)

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Troy Laundry Company
[p.9]Troy Laundry Company with wagons, 1904. These buildings, viewed here from 600 East near 400 South, later housed the Utah Technical College. They were replaced by a strip mall in 1995. (Neg. 1270.)

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Emery-Holmes Apts
[p.10]The Emery‑Holmes Apartments, 1904. This structure was owned by Salt Lake’s “Silver Queen,” Susannah Bransford Emery Holmes. Later called the Eagle Gate Apartments, the building was torn down in 1984 amid considerable public controversy and replaced by a new apartment building of the same name. (Neg. 1382.)