Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

University of Utah
[p.101] University of Utah, March 1914. This photograph shows the newly completed Park Building. The circular drive visible here became known as “President’s Circle.” Although the circle was later reconfigured into a “U”-shaped drive, the name stuck. (Neg. 15244.)

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LDS 1st Ward Chapel
[p.102] LDS 1st Ward Chapel, April 1914. Shipler took this photograph for the architecture firm of Pope and Burton, which had designed the building. These architects were heavily influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright and are best known for their design of the LDS temple in Cardston, Alberta, Canada. This chapel stood on 800 East near 800 South and was one of the finest examples of Prairie Style architecture in Utah. It was demolished in 1976. (Neg. 15259-A.)

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Salt Lake City from Prospect Hill
[p.103] Salt Lake City seen from Prospect Hill, June 20, 1914. In this view looking southwest from a hill above City Creek Canyon, the skyline is dominated by several structures built within the previous five years, including the Boston and Newhouse buildings, the Walker Bank, and the Hotel Utah. (Neg. 15456.)

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Utah State Capitol
[p.104] The Utah State Capitol under construction, October 15, 1914. Officials broke ground for the Capitol on December 26, 1912. Shipler was hired to document the process of construction and captured over 150 images by the time the building was dedicated in 1916. (Neg. 136.)

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Westminster College
[p.105] Westminster College, October 27, 1914. When Presbyterian church officials determined to establish a college in Salt Lake City, they selected a site on the outskirt of town near Sugarhouse. The semi-rural setting of the college is evident in this photograph, taken from the west side of the campus. Ferry Hall (on the right) was razed in 1987, but Converse Hall (on the left) remains the centerpiece of the campus today. (Neg. 15773.)

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United States Tire Co.
[p.106] United States Tire Company, May 28, 1915. This commercial structure on the corner of State Street and Exchange Place was built by Samuel Newhouse, a champion of the south end of the city’s business district. The “N” emblazoned on the cartouches above each pillar attests to Newhouse’s involvement. This building still stands, but remodeling has removed or hidden its detailing. (Neg. 16229.)

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Liberty Bell at Oregon Short Line Railroad Depot
[p.107] The Liberty Bell at the Oregon Short Line Railroad Depot, July 11, 1915. The famous bell stopped in Salt Lake City on its way to the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. The Deseret News reported that the rail car carrying the bell was unhitched from the train and pulled to Pioneer Park where “upwards of 30,000 children had collected awaiting the Bell’s arrival.” (Neg. 16289.)

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Utah Light and Traction Co. offices
[p.108] Utah Light and Traction Company offices, January 12, 1916. This building at 133 South West Temple was built for the Salt Lake Tribune in 1890. This photograph was taken for Utah Power and Light Company, which had purchased U.L.&T. Co. the previous year. Both this building and the adjacent residence are gone now and a park is found in their place. (Neg. 16690.)

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1300 East 900 South
[p.109] Bad roads, 1300 East and 900 South, March 25, 1916. Shipler shot this view documenting the condition of the street for the Salt Lake Tribune. East High School can be seen on the left; the Sarah Daft Home is visible in the distance. (Neg. 16817.)

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Hotel Utah
[p.110] Hotel Utah from the lawn of the Gardo House, July 1916. At its opening in 1911, the Hotel Utah was the finest such establishment in the city, a position it maintained for many years. This photograph is one of a series of sixty images Shipler took for “Colonel” Edwin F. Holmes and his wife Susannah shortly before they sold the Gardo House and moved to California. The new LDS Church Offices, visible on the right, were still under construction when this photograph was taken. (Neg.17205.)