Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

1050 South and 1000 East
[p.11]Looking north from about 1050 South on 1000 East, May 29, 1905. The building in the distance is the Judge Miners Home, a hospital established by the Judge family, who had acquired their wealth in mining. The building later housed Judge Memorial High School. By 1915, the open land seen here was filled with houses. (Neg. 1566.)

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Main Street and South Temple
[p.12]Main Street looking south from South Temple, June 19, 1905. (Neg. 1607.)

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Utah Ice and Storage Company
[p.13]Utah Ice and Storage Company, November 24, 1905. This industrial building is notable for the signage painted on its brick walls. The building still stands, minus its cooling tower but with the lettering still visible, on the southeast corner of 600 West and 300 South streets. (Neg. 1936.)

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Eli L. Price Grocer
[p.14]Eli L. Price Grocer, November 29, 1905. This grocery store was located at 18 South Main Street and carried a variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats. This site is now part of the Crossroads Mall. (Neg. 1938.)

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University of Utah
[p.15]The University of Utah viewed from the southeast, December 9, 1905. The university first moved onto this property, formerly part of Fort Douglas, in 1900. Four years later the campus had grown into this complex of substantial buildings. (Neg. 1964.)

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Salt Lake High School
[p.16]Salt Lake High School, from the southeast, December 10, 1905. The day after taking the previous photograph, Shipler photographed this view of the university’s former campus on 300 West between 200 and 300 North. This building, constructed in the 1880s when the university was still called the University of Deseret, became the home of the Salt Lake High School after the university vacated it. In 1921 this structure was replaced by the current West High School building. (Neg. 1965.)

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Templeton Bldg
[p.17]The Templeton Building, December 12, 1905. Located on the southeast corner of South Temple and Main Street, the Templeton Building was originally a hotel. By the time this photo was taken, the word “Hotel” has been removed from above the main entrance and the building has been transformed into one of Salt Lake’s premier office buildings. By 1960, the structure was deemed expendable and was razed to make way for the Kennecott Building. (Neg. 1973.)

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Kearns Mansion
[p.18]Sightseeing auto at the Kearns Mansion, March 31, 1906. This home was built at 603 East South Temple for Thomas Kearns, one of the Park City mining kingpins and later a U.S. Senator. In 1937 Kearns’s widow gave the house to the State of Utah for use as a governor’s residence. (Neg. 2092.)

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Kensington Flats
[p.19]The Kensington Flats on North Main Street, December 7, 1906. As Salt Lake City grew, developers rushed to meet the demand for downtown housing. To the right is the old George F. Culmer residence. When this residence was torn down in 1972, the tower roof was salvaged and placed in Trolley Square. (Neg. 2609.)

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Federal Building
[p.20]The Federal Building, March 12, 1907. This building on Main Street between 300 and 400 South streets housed federal offices and the Post Office for many years. In 1932 it was extensively remodeled and expanded; it currently functions as a courthouse. (Neg. 2746.)