Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett 

No-Ni-Shee Arch
p.111] The No-Ni-Shee Arch, September 21, 1916. This temporary structure was erected for the “Festival of the Salt Princess” and sparkled from a coating of salt. A poster for the festival showed a Native American maiden shedding tears into a lake and identified her as “No-Ni-Shee, the Maid who put the Salt in Salt Lake.” The arch stood on Main Street for a time after the festival and was used by the Republican Party to advertise its candidates for public office. (Neg. 17359.)

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ice skating at Liberty Park
[p.112] Ice skating at Liberty Park, January 1, 1917. This property had originally been part of the farming plat on the edge of the city. In 1881 the city purchased the land from Brigham Young’s family and created Salt Lake’s largest park. Today Liberty Park remains an important green space and a favorite recreational area. (Neg. 17638.)

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garden at State Prison
[p.113] Garden at the State Prison looking west, July 1917. The prison buildings are visible in the distance. This site is now Sugarhouse Park. (Neg. 18076.)

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State Street near 2100 South
[p.114] View looking north on State Street near 2100 South, September 28, 1917. The building on the right is the Salt Lake County Hospital, later demolished to make way for the current County Government Complex. (Neg. 18339.)

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Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Building
[p.115] Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Building, November 2, 1917. The “service flag” and sign promoting war bonds were symbols of support for American armed forces during the “Great War.” Some of the decorative stone panels were salvaged when the building was razed; they stood for many years at this site of the west side of State Street between South Temple and 100 South. (Neg. 18412.)

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Main Street between 200 and 300 South
[p.116] The west side of Main Street between 200 and 300 South streets, May 12, 1918. The David Keith Building (center right) was built in 1902 to house the Keith O’Brien store. Today it houses Sam Weller’s Zion Bookstore. (Neg. 18732.)

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ZCMI
[p. 117] Zion’s Cooperative Mercantile Institution, May 31, 1918. The “1868” date on the faςade refers to the year ZCMI was founded. A structure for the institution was first built here in 1876 and is visible as the center portion of the building seen in this photograph. The section on the right was added in 1880; the remaining section was built in 1901, completing the faςade shown here. In 1973 this metal faςade was removed and the building demolished. The faςade was re-worked (making it symmetrical) and attached to the new building constructed at the same site on Main Street. (Neg. 18766.)

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Beck Street
[p.118] Looking north on Beck Street at the northernmost edge of the city, June 5, 1918. Shipler captured this view of an accident scene for Salt Lake City Corporation. While this scene is almost pastoral, the area has since become a blighted industrial district. (Neg. 18775.)

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West Temple St.
[p.119] West Temple Street, June 24, 1918. This view looking south from South Temple shows a street lined with a variety of commercial buildings where the Salt Palace Convention Center stands today. (Neg. 18864.)

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Anderson's Tower
[p.120] Automobile at Anderson’s Tower, May 14, 1919. Robert Anderson built this structure overlooking City Creek Canyon near 6th Avenue and A Street in 1884. Reportedly Anderson hoped to charge visitors to climb the tower to survey the city below. Because the view at the base of the tower was nearly as good as that at the top, the structure was not a financial success. Nevertheless, the romantic “folly” stood as an important landmark until it was removed at the insistence of the Anderson family in 1932. (Neg. 19456.)