Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

State Street
[p.121]State Street looking north from below 300 South, February 16, 1920. The circular sign above the intersection of 300 South and State streets identifies the area as the “Shopping Center.” By 1913, 300 South had become known as “Broadway,” part of an effort to promote the area as a fashionable retail district. Keith-O’Brien’s, Auerbach’s, and The Paris were the primary anchors here until the 1970s. (Neg. 20049.)

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Spring Frolic and Mardi Gras
[p.122]The Spring Frolic and Mardi Gras, April 28, 1920. The American Legion sponsored this festival, which lasted several days, at “Auerbach’s field,” just north of the City and County Building. (Neg. 20159.)

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Belvedere Apartments and Social Hall
[p.123]The Belvedere Apartments and the Social Hall, May 20, 1920. In this image, the new high-rise apartment building dwarfs its older neighbor. The Social Hall was erected in 1852 and served a variety of purposes, including that of a theater and amusement hall. Despite its importance as an early pioneer building, the Social Hall was gone by January 1922. (Neg. 20500.)

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Main Street
[p.124]Main Street looking north to the Newhouse Hotel, November 10, 1920. Samuel Newhouse built this large hotel as part of his effort to create a “gentile” (non-Mormon) business hub at the southern end of Main Street. Earlier he had built the Boston and Newhouse buildings as well as a number of buildings on Exchange Place. The hotel project finally bankrupted Newhouse by the time it opened in 1915, but it remained one of the finest hotels in Salt Lake for many years. Although numerous Main Street buildings have been razed, when the Hotel Newhouse was demolished with explosives in 1983, it was the largest structure to disappear from the downtown cityscape. (Neg. 20729.)

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Orpheum Theater
[p.125]The Orpheum Theater, November 30, 1920. This lavish theater on 200 South was built for the Orpheum Vaudeville Circuit and completed in 1913. It later became the Capitol Theater and the steel arch over the street was altered to reflect the change. In 1973 a city ordinance forced theater owners to remove the arch and it was relocated to Trolley Square. In the mid-1970s, the theater underwent renovation and now serves as a center for the performing arts. (Neg. 20768.)

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Main Street
[p.126]Main Street from the top of the Newhouse Hotel, May 18, 1920. Because of its height and location, the Newhouse Hotel offered a full view of Main Street and became a popular vantage point for photographers. (Neg. 21398.)

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Strevell-Paterson Hardware Co.
[p.127]Group in front of the Strevell-Paterson Hardware Company, November 15, 1921. This building stood on West Temple between 100 and 200 South streets where the Salt Palace Convention Center now stands. Like many buildings of its time, the faςade exhibits a level of detail absent from most modern buildings. (Neg. 21415.)

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LDS Hospital
[p.128]LDS Hospital, March 14, 1922. Dr. William H. Groves left his estate to the LDS church for construction of a hospital. When the castle-like structure was completed in 1904, it was known as Dr. Groves L.D.S. Hospital. The hospital has grown into a much larger complex of buildings, but still occupies this property on 8th Avenue between C and D streets. (Neg. 21524.)

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view over Social Hall Avenue
[p.129]View over Social Hall Avenue from the University Club, October 30, 1922. The old City Hall can be seen at the center of the photograph. Completed in 1866, the building housed the police department after city administrative offices moved to the new City and County Building in 1894. When this image was taken, the State Workshop for the Blind occupied the structure. In 1961 City Hall was dismantled to make way for a new Federal Building, but was reconstructed on Capitol Hill. (Neg. 22094.)

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Dinwoodey Furniture Co.
[p.130]Dinwoodey Furniture Company, March 23, 1923. Henry Dinwoodey began building furniture soon after his arrival in Utah in 1855 and eventually became the premier furniture manufacturer and retailer in Salt Lake City. This building housed the Dinwoodey store from 1890 until the business closed in 1985. Today the building stands alone on 100 South between Main and West Temple streets, but a blank modern faςade has replaced the arches and windows seen in this view. (Neg. 22315.)