Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Independent Gas and Oil Co. service station
[p.131]Independent Gas and Oil Company service station, April 20, 1923. The service station was built on this property at Main and 400 South streets after the old St. Paul’s Episcopal church had been demolished. The station would, in turn, be replaced by a steel-and-glass high-rise buildings for First Security Bank, which was completed in 1955. (Neg. 22386.)

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Rowland Hall
[p.132]Maypole at Rowland Hall, May 27, 1925. This Episcopal school for girls was founded in 1880 and established its campus on 1st Avenue between A and B streets. The school remains in operation 120 years later. (Neg. 24353)

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Walker Terrace
[p.133]Walker Terrace, November 24, 1925. The term “terrace” was often applied to early-twentieth-century row houses. These solid looking structures were built for Matthew H. Walker in 1890, presumably as rental properties. This view looks north on West Temple between 400 and 500 South. (Neg. 24699)

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Syms Grocer Bldg and Jennings and Cornwall Warehouse
[p.134]Syms Grocer Building and Jennings and Cornwall Warehouse, June 23, 1926. These buildings on 200 South between 300 and 400 West were erected in Salt Lake City’s warehouse district. In recent years this part of town has seen a transformation and these warehouses have become condominiums. (Neg. 25215.)

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new St. Mary's of the Wasatch
[p.135]The new St. Mary’s of the Wasatch, seen through the entrance gate, September 28, 1926. This Catholic girls’ school had a long history as St. Mary’s Academy, located on 200 West near 200 South. When the school moved to this building in the foothills south of Emigration Canyon, Wasatch was added to the name. The building was sold in 1972 and housing subdivision has since taken its place, but the gate tower has survived as part of a residence just south of 1300 South on 2640 East. (Neg. 25395.)

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Utah State Fair
[p.136]The Utah State Fair, looking southwest from the grand stand, October 9, 1926. This property on North Temple has been the home of the state fair since 1902. The Coliseum on the right, arguably the grandest building ever built at the fairgrounds, was demolished in 1997. (Neg. 25437.)

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Federal Reserve Bank and Medical Arts Bldg
[p.137]The Federal Reserve Bank and the Medical Arts Building, March 22, 1927. This corner at South Temple and State Street was the site of the Gardo House prior to the construction of these buildings in 1926. Today the Eagle Gate Plaza and Office Tower stand here. (Neg. 25891.)

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Rio Grande Street
[p.138]Rio Grande Street looking south from 200 South, March 28, 1927. The D&RG Railroad depot is barely visible through the trees. The park on the right is now the site of a Traveler’s Aid Society shelter. (Neg. 25894.)

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Parade honoring Charles Lindbergh
[p.139]Parade honoring Charles Lindbergh, September 3, 1927. Following his famous flight from New York to Paris, Lindbergh toured the country as a national celebrity. Shipler photographed the Salt Lake crowd as Lindbergh’s car drove through Liberty Park. (Neg. 26269.)

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Market Row
[p.140]Market Row on 100 South, May 1, 1928. Shipler took this photograph to document a water main break, but in doing so captured an image of period automobiles and a row of buildings known as Market Row. The City Market had originally been located on Main Street in the middle of 100 South. In the 1870s, the market moved to the east side of West Temple, near 100 South. These buildings grew out of that market and housed a variety of small shops, including meat, fish, and fruit markets. A large hotel now stands on this site. (Neg. 26671.)