Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Fifth East Hotel
[p.141]Fifth East Hotel, May 7, 1928. This imposing Victorian structure at 145 South 500 East was built as the Women’s Industrial Christian Home. Completed in 1889, with funds appropriated by Congress, the Home was intended to provide a shelter for women and children, especially those escaping Mormon polygamy. Few took advantage of this haven and the Home soon closed. The government sold the building, which eventually became the Fifth East Hotel and later the Ambassador Athletic Club. The club closed its doors in 1985 and the building was subsequently razed. (Neg. 26687.)

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Salt Lake Theatre
[p.142]The Salt Lake Theatre, August 17, 1928. When completed in 1862, this building dominated the cityscape as the largest building in town. It served for many years as the primary venue for the performing arts in the city. Shipler took this photograph for the Mountain States Telephone Company, which had purchased the property several months earlier. By the end of August 1928, the Telephone Company announced its intention to demolish the building. Despite heated public protest, the structure was torn down several months later. (Neg. 26844.)

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Pantages Theater
[p.143]The Pantages Theater, September 1, 1928. This Main Street faςade actually covered two separate buildings that had earlier housed Auerbach’s Department Store as well as an alley next to the Kearns Building. The theater itself was added to the rear of these buildings and its interior was perhaps the most elaborate ever built in Salt Lake. The faςade was eventually remodeled as the Utah Theater, and the interior was divided into an upper and a lower theater, but much of the interior detail reportedly survives. Shipler’s studio is visible to the right of the theater entrance. (Neg.26862.)

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Salt Lake Tribune Building
[p.144]Crowd “watching” World Series at the Salt Lake Tribune Building, October 1928. Loudspeakers broadcast the games and the scoreboard, nicknamed “Old Ironsides,” lit up to show the direction the ball was hit. The Salt Lake Tribune later moved from this building to the Ezra Thompson Building on the left. (Neg. 26921.)

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Airplane Service Station
[p.145]The Airplane Service Station, October 1, 1929. Superior Gas and Oil Company operated this new “theme” service station on the corner of 100 South and State streets. Less than a year earlier, the Salt Lake Theater had stood here; ten years later, Mountain States Telephone would replace the station with a new building. (Neg. 27475.)

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Third Presbyterian Church
[p.146]Third Presbyterian Church, May 10, 1930. This building on 1100 East and 1700 South was originally known as the Gunton Memorial Chapel of Westminster College, as the stone over the doorway indicates. The church was later remodeled and is now an unrecognizable commercial building that houses the Salt Lake Costume Company. (Neg. 27748.)

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construction of new South High School
[p.147]Construction of the new South High School, September 29, 1930. This Art Deco style building served as a high school until 1988, when it was turned over to the Salt Lake Community College for use as its South City Campus. (Neg. 27852.)

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Main Street
[p.148]Looking south on Main Street from the Templeton Building, January 27, 1932. (Neg. 28185.)

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funeral at Buddhist temple
[p.149]Funeral at the Buddhist temple, February 7, 1932. Shipler photographed this funeral gathering for Evans and Early Mortuary. The temple, which stood at 247 West 100 South, served as an important community center for the city’s Japanese population. (Neg. 28194.)

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Second Church of Christ Scientist
[p.150]Second Church of Christ Scientist, October 8, 1932. This classical-styled building stood on South Temple between 500 and 600 East streets. Completed in 1918, it served the church until the congregation moved to a new building on Foothill Drive in 1965. The old church was demolished in 1977 to make way for the Governor’s Plaza condominiums. (Neg. 28274.)