Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Union Pacific Hotel
[p.161]The Union Pacific Hotel, November 21, 1936. In the early 1890s, this hotel opened across the street from the railroad depot under this name. In subsequent years the name changed and the old depot was replaced by a larger station. By the time this photograph was taken, the hotel had returned to its original name. This block is now occupied by the Triad Center. (Neg. 29528.)

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Dooly Bldg
[p.162]The Dooly Building, December 24, 1936. This structure was one of Salt Lake’s most important architectural landmarks. It was designed by Chicago architect Louis Sullivan and built of local red sandstone in 1892. The strong arches and selectively placed geometric detailing are typical of Sullivan’s work. The landmark was demolished in 1964, and the site on the southwest corner of West Temple and 200 South was more recently been occupies by the Shilo Inn. (Neg. 29559.)

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Centre Theatre
[p.163]The Centre Theatre at Broadway and State streets, December 3, 1937. This Art Deco styled theater exemplified the heyday of great motion picture palaces. The theater, which is shown under construction here, was razed in 1989. The Broadway Center office tower and theaters now stand in its place. (Neg. 29722.)

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city streetcar
[p.164]City streetcar turning onto Main Street at 500 South, March 13, 1938. (Neg. 29786.)

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Wasatch Mountains
[p.165]View of the Wasatch Mountains from the steps of the State Capitol, May 7, 1939. (Neg. 30333.)

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Grand Central Market
[p.166]Grand Central Market at North Temple and Main Street (looking north), June 20, 1939. The Market later became home of Mormon Handicraft and was eventually demolished to make room for the LDS Conference Center. (Neg. 30490.)

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Growers' Market
[p.167]Growers’ Market, September 9, 1939. Farmers from rural areas around Salt Lake City brought produce to sell in this open-air market. The property off West Temple between 400 and 500 South streets was cleared in 1973 for construction of a hotel. (Neg. 30747.)

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Wasatch Warm Springs Plunge
[p.168]Wasatch Warm Springs Plunge, October 12, 1939. Salt Lake City’s settlers built a bathhouse at about 900 North and 300 West as early as 1850 to take advantage of the area’s warm springs. This later structure, erected in 1921, became home to the Chilren’s Museum of Utah after the plunge closed its doors. (Neg. 30850.)

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Richards Street
[p.169]Richards Street, October 20, 1939. This was one of many small streets created in the late nineteenth century, bisecting the city’s original ten-acre blocks. The street derived its name from the fact that much of the property on this block had once belonged to LDS church leader Willard Richards. This street disappeared with the construction of the Crossroads Mall, but its name lives on as the designation for the mall’s lower level. (Neg. 30868.)

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Eagle's Hall
[p.170]Eagle’s Hall, 400 South and West Temple, April 12, 1940. This building was erected for the Fraternal Order of Eagles in 1915-16. Although the eagle symbol remains, the building now houses a dance club. (Neg. 31487.)