Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

LDS Chapel 17th Ward
[p.21] LDS Chapel 17th Ward, March 22, 1907. This church stood on 200 North between West Temple and 200 West streets. Before it was razed in 1966, its art glass window depicting church founder Joseph Smith’s first vision was removed and placed in a new building across the street. (Neg. 2759.)

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striking streetcar workers
[p.22] Striking streetcar workers stopping a streetcar on Main Street, April 29, 1907. The conservative Deseret News called the strikers “hoodlums” and “hooligans” in reporting assaults on several streetcars that day. “As the car approached the mob hooted and yelled, shouting `Scab! Scab!’ `Down with him. Give it to him, boys.’ And the shower of rotten eggs began.” Late that night, through the mediation of LDS church leader B. H. Roberts, management and the union reached an agreement and the strike ended. (Neg. 2852.)

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Whittingham Block
[p.23] Whittingham Block, May 7, 1907. This building was constructed for the Brigham Young Trust Company and named for Brigham Young’s birthplace in Vermont. The B.Y.T. Co. was a real estate management firm originally established to handle the property from Brigham Young’s estate. This building stood on 100 South and West Temple where a large hotel is now located. (Neg. 2872.)

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South Temple Street
[p.24] South Temple Street looking northeast from the Dooly Residence, May 9, 1907. The David Keith Mansion is at the left, the Thomas Kearns Mansion at the far right. This photograph was taken when South Temple, or “Brigham Street,” as it was unofficially known, was in its heyday as the most prestigious residential street in the city. (Neg. 2879.)

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Plum Alley
[p.25] Looking south on Plum Alley, August 24, 1907. This narrow street ran north from 200 South between Main and State streets. For many years it was home to Salt Lake City’s “Chinatown.” Plum Alley still exists today, but it is little more than a driveway running underneath a concrete parking terrace. (Neg. 3056.)

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Bootblacks Union
[p.26] The Bootblacks Union at the City and County Building, September 2, 1907. This was one of many labor unions that gathered to march in the annual Labor Day Parade. In Salt Lake City, as in other American cities, labor unions effected significant changes in the way workers were treated by employers in the early part of the twentieth century. (Neg. 3066.)

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Oregon Short Line Railroad Depot
[p.27] Oregon Short Line Railroad Depot, November 9, 1907. This view looking southeast from the North Temple viaduct shows the train yards and the 1884 depot. Within three years after this photo was taken, the depot was replaced by a new Union Station. (Neg. 3187.)

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Newsboys
[p.28] Newsboys buying the Christmas paper at the Deseret News Building, December 14, 1907. The special Christmas edition carried an overview of the year’s major events. This photograph appeared in the Deseret News the next day with an announcement that the “Newsies” had achieved record sales with the special edition. The article quoted one colorful boy as saying, “I got me poipers on the street and I shuved ’em out faster ‘n I could woik me arm. Den I went back for more, and I kep it up till I wuz just too tired, and I quit.” (Neg. 3222.)

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Salt Lake City Police
[p.29] Salt Lake City Police patrol wagon, December 24, 1907. This photograph is taken in front of the old City Hall, which became Police Headquarters following the construction of the City and County Building. (Neg. 3231.)

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Fort Douglas
[p.30] Officers’ Quarters at Fort Douglas, February 5, 1908. Fort Douglas was established east of the city in 1862, officially to protect the overland mail route and unofficially to keep an eye on the Mormons. These red sandstone duplexes were built in the 1870s and have changed remarkably little since that time. (Neg. 8107.)