Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Salt Lake High School cadets
[p.31] Salt Lake High School cadets on parade, April 24, 1908. Students from the military training program march north on Main Street, which at the turn of the twentieth century was cluttered with utility poles. (Neg. 8278.)

• • • • •

view from Boston Bldg
[p.32] View looking northwest from the Boston Building at 351 South Main Street, April 30, 1908. The city’s business district at this time was a mass of brick buildings crowded together on the edges of various streets and alleys. The tallest building at the left is the Dooly Building at the corner of West Temple and 200 South; in the distance, near the center of the photograph, the roof of Westside High School is visible. (Neg. 8296.)

• • • • •

northeast view from Boston Bldg
[p.33] Looking northeast from atop the Boston Building, April 30, 1908. The Brooks Arcade at 300 South and State Street, seen near the center, is one of the few surviving historic buildings in this area today. Also visible in this photograph are the old Masonic Temple, the Cathedral of the Madeleine, the First Presbyterian Church, the Kearns Mansion, the Collegiate Institute, the First Methodist‑Episcopal Church, and the Knutsford Hotel. (Neg. 8299.)

• • • • •

Gardo House
[p.34] Philip Dern Company painting the Gardo House, May 14, 1908. This mansion on the corner of South Temple and State Street was built in the 1870s as an official residence for LDS church president Brigham Young. Although Young died before the house was completed, the fact that his youngest wife, Amelia Folsom, was to live in it earned it the nickname “the Amelia Palace.” When Shipler took this photograph, it was residence of “Silver Queen” Susannah Bransford Emery Holmes and her husband, “Colonel” Edwin Holmes. The elaborate home was demolished in 1921 to make way for a Federal Reserve Bank. Today the site is occupied by the Eagle Gate Plaza and Office Tower. (Neg. 8319.)

• • • • •

flooding on North Temple Street
[p.35] Flooding on North Temple Street looking west from 800 West, June 15, 1908. For many years, City Creek ran down the center of North Temple to the Jordan River. Flooding in the low‑lying west side of the city was common well into the twentieth century. (Neg. 8424.)

• • • • •

Boston and Newhouse bldgs
[p.36] The Boston and Newhouse buildings under construction, June 30, 1908. For a time these were the city’s tallest buildings. (Neg. 8469.)

• • • • •

Roy Jacobs family birthday party
[p.37] Roy Jacobs family birthday party in front of a log cabin, September 15, 1908. This cabin was originally built by Osmyn Deuel in the Mormon pioneers’ original fort of 1847, located at the present site of Pioneer Park. When settlers moved out of the fort, the cabin was relocated to a lot on the southeast corner of West Temple and 200 North streets. Although a larger home was eventually built in front of the cabin, the old structure was preserved as an outbuilding. In time it was again moved and for many years was protected under a canopy on Temple Square. Today it stands on West Temple between the LDS Church Museum of History and Art and the Family History Library, where it is honored as the oldest surviving house in Salt Lake City. (Neg. 8611.)

• • • • •

"Stockade"
[p.38] Workers constructing the “Stockade,” September 21, 1908. Previously, Commercial Street (now Regent Street) had been home to the city’s “red‑light” district for decades. In an effort to move prostitution out of the business district and into a less visible location, city leaders erected this enclosed complex inside the block between 100 and 200 South and 500 and 600 West streets. By the time the Stockade closed in 1911, it had already given 200 South a reputation that would live on for many years. (Neg. 8630.)

• • • • •

Beehive House and Eagle Gate
[p.39] The Beehive House and Eagle Gate, October 9, 1908. The original Eagle Gate spanned the entrance to Brigham Young’s estate at State Street and South Temple. The larger version of the gate was erected in 1891, after State Street had been extended north. In 1963, with the widening of the street, a third Eagle Gate was placed on this site. (Neg. 8665.)

• • • • •

White Bridge
[p.40] The White Bridge, November 7, 1908. This photograph appeared in the Deseret News of the same date with an article announcing the demolition of the bridge. The structure, which spanned the Jordan River at North Temple near 1200 West, was erected in 1860 under the direction of Henry Grow, who would later supervise construction of the roof of the Salt Lake Tabernacle. (Neg. 8734.)