Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church
[p.41] Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, December 10, 1908. This elegant little church stood on 400 South facing up Rio Grande Street. It served the city’s Greek community from 1905 until the completion of a larger building in 1924. A warehouse stands in place of this building today. (Neg. 8829.)

• • • • •

Salt Lake 5 and 10 Cent Store
[p.42] The Salt Lake 5 and 10 Cent Store, December 10, 1908. The Daft Building housed a number of businesses over the years, including the 5 and 10 and, later, Daynes Jewelry. Today it is one of the few nineteenth‑century survivors on Main Street. (Neg. 8830.)

• • • • •

Latter-day Saints' University
[p.43] Latter Day Saints’ University, December 23, 1908. In addition to these buildings on the corner of Main Street and North Temple, LDSU also utilized space in the Lion House. In 1956 the LDS church’s Relief Society Building was completed in the grassy area visible in this photograph, and in 1962 the buildings seen here were demolished to make way for a new LDS church office tower. (Neg. 8888.5.)

• • • • •

ZCMI
[p.44] Zion’s Cooperative Mercantile Institution (ZCMI) wagons in front of the Consolidated Wagon and Machinery Company, January 18, 1909. Although Utah had seen its first automobile by this time, horse‑drawn vehicles remained the primary mode of transportation in Salt Lake City. The Consolidated Wagon and Machinery building still stands on State Street, albeit without its elaborate façade, and houses Zim’s craft store. (Neg. 8923.)

• • • • •

Main Street
[p.45] Main Street looking north from 200 South, February 18, 1909. Ensign Peak looms above the juxtaposition of buggy and automobile. The sign for Shipler’s photography studio is visible at the right of the photograph. (Neg. 9037.)

• • • • •

Rio Grande Baptist Church
[p.46] Baptist Sunday school, February 24, 1909. The Rio Grande Baptist Church operated in this location at 1044 West 200 South until 1952, but the building survived intact until May 1998, when a fire gutted the church. (Neg. 9024.)

• • • • •

Temple Square
[p.47] Temple Square viewed from the Templeton Building, March 31, 1909. The small building visible below the temple is Orson Pratt’s pioneer observatory. The new Bureau of Information stands near the south gate. Over the years, the perspective from the Templeton Building became the best‑known view of Temple Square. (Neg. 9162.)

• • • • •

Osborne auto party
[p.48] Osborne auto party, April 7, 1909. The automobile offered new mobility to those who could afford it, including many women. This photograph was taken at 633 East 100 South in front of the William Godbe House. Godbe is known as an early Salt Lake businessman, a Mormon dissident, and a founder of the Salt Lake Tribune. His house, probably the finest Gothic Revival style residence in the state, was replaced by apartments about 1925. (Neg. 9182.)

• • • • •

Main Street
[p.49] Main Street looking south from the Daynes Jewelry Store, April 14, 1909. The clutter of wires and utility poles that was so prominent on Main Street just a few years earlier is now almost entirely gone. (Neg. 9192.)

• • • • •

Knight Carriage and Auto Company
[p.50] Knight Carriage and Auto Company, May 13, 1909. Many businesses catering to horse and buggy transportation eventually adapted to serve the new demand for automobiles. Notice the exotic Victorian residence to the left. Both of these buildings were located on the south side of Social Hall Avenue. (Neg. 9285.)