Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Race Track
[p.51] Race Track and Grandstand at the State Fairgrounds, May 15, 1909. The track accommodated both horse racing and early auto racing. (Neg. 9307.)

• • • • •

John E. Dooly Residence
[p.52] John E. Dooly Residence, June 11, 1909. This home was built on the corner of South Temple and 500 East streets in 1872. Nearly forty years later, it was still elegant and well maintained. It was demolished in 1946 and a medical office building now stands in its place. (Neg. 9393.)

• • • • •

Deseret National Bank
[p.53] Deseret National Bank, June 14, 1909. This building, on the northeast corner of 100 South and Main Street, was typical of several Italianate-style commercial buildings constructed in Salt Lake City in the 1870s. It was razed about 1917 for construction of a larger bank, which still stands. (Neg. 9399.)

• • • • •

Hotel Utah
[p.54] Excavation for the Hotel Utah, July 9, 1909. The work is being done by hand with the help of horses and wagons. In the background are the Brigham Young Monument and, behind that, the Deseret News Building. (Neg. 9488.)

• • • • •

Main Street and 500 South
[p.55] Main Street looking north from 500 South, July 23, 1909. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church can be seen on the right, on the corner later occupied by the First Security Bank Building. To the north are the Newhouse and Boston buildings. (Neg. 9536.)

• • • • •

Utah Lumber Co.
[p.56] Utah Lumber Company, July 27, 1909. This large warehouse was located on 100 South between 300 and 400 West streets, across from where the Delta Center now stands. (Neg. 9549.)

• • • • •

Mormon Tabernacle
[p.57] The interior of the Mormon Tabernacle, decorated for the Grand Army of the Republic, August 2, 1909. The G.A.R., an organization of Civil War veterans, held its 1909 national convention in Salt Lake City. (Neg. 9576.)

• • • • •

Living Flag
[p.58] The “Living Flag,” August 10, 1909. This patriotic formation of school children was assembled for the G.A.R. parade. The “flag” was set up at the intersection of 700 South and Main Street where parade participants turned around to march back up the other side of Main Street. Shipler shot this photograph the day before the parade, presumably at the dress rehearsal. (Neg. 9615.)

• • • • •

Kenyon Hotel
[p.59] The Kenyon Hotel, August 11, 1909. Situated on the southeast corner of 200 South and Main Street, the Kenyon was perhaps the most prominent hotel in the city in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The sign above the entrance indicates that the hotel was serving as the G.A.R. Women’s Auxiliary headquarters during the national convention. The Kenyon was replaced by the sleek, modern Salisbury Building in 1935. The latter housed Walgreen Drugs and J.C. Penny Company for many years before being extensively remodeled and enlarged in 1967 for a large Penny’s department store. Today the department store is gone, and the Utah One Center stands in its place. (Neg. 9668.)

• • • • •

Federation of Labor Building
[p.60] Federation of Labor Building, August 16, 1909. Albert Fisher, who owned a local brewery, erected this building in 1903 as a meeting hall for local labor unions. Ten years later, Fisher remodeled the structure and it became the Plandome Hotel. Today the building remains at 400 South and State Street and houses office and retail space. (Neg. 9681.)