Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

F. J. Lucas Grocery Store
[p.61] F. J. Lucas Grocery Store, September 25, 1909. Located at 267-269 West 200 South, this store offered an impressive variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. This site is a parking lot today. (Neg. 9816.)

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Salt Lake City Jail
[p.62] Construction of the Salt Lake City Jail, September 29, 1909. Shipler captured this image for the Pauly Jail Company. The view looks toward the City and County Building from the east. This property is now the site of the new Salt Lake City Public Library. (Neg. 9823.)

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Sugarhouse
[p.63] Sugarhouse, October 4, 1909. This photograph provides an early view looking west on 2100 South near 1100 East. The property on the right is now a plaza with the familiar Sugarhouse monument. The building on the left still stands but has been remodeled beyond recognition. (Neg. 9848.)

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South Temple from 300 West
[p.64] Looking northeast on South Temple Street from 300 West, November 6, 1909. This photograph was commissioned by the contractors working on the building visible at the left of the image. The house in the center was built for George Q. Cannon in the 1860s, and was reportedly the second largest residence in the territory at the time. It was remodeled in the Second Empire style in the 1870s. Today this entire block is a parking lot. (Neg. 9952.)

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newspaper wagon
[p.65] Newspaper wagon, March 23, 1910. These vendors sold a variety of national and international newspapers from this wagon on the southwest corner of Main Street and 200 South. (Neg. 10444.)

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Salt Lake Livery and Transfer Co.
[p.66] Salt Lake Livery and Transfer Company, April 14, 1910. With the changing times, the stone horse head seen in this photograph was removed and the building became the Salt Lake Transportation Company. It stood on West Temple, approximately where the Salt Lake Arts Center is now located. (Neg. 10556.)

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Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Depot
[p.67] The new Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Depot, April 15, 1910. In the days before interstate highways and air travel, Salt Lake City’s train stations were its primary connection to the rest of the world. In this view looking from 200 South, the depot is approaching completion. Note how residential and tree-filled the surrounding neighborhood was at the time the depot was constructed. (Neg. 10561.)

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Enos A. Wall residence
[p.68] The Enos A. Wall residence under construction, May 3, 1910. “Colonel” Wall made his fortune in mining and purchased a house on South Temple in 1905. This view shows the structure undergoing an extensive re-design and expansion. After taking the photograph, Shipler painted the name of the project architect on the glass negative. When completed in 1915, the house was one of the finest on “Brigham Street.” After Wall’s death, the mansion housed a Jewish community center and eventually became home to the LDS Business College. (Neg. 10698.)

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Hancock Bros. Fruit Co.
[p.69] Hancock Bros. Fruit Company, July 30, 1910. This section of Pierpont Avenue between 200 and 400 West was home to a number of produce wholesalers. These buildings now house Artspace and the end wall visible here is the canvas for the city’s most colorful exterior building mural. (Neg. 10901.)

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old Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Depot
[p.70] The old Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Depot, August 18, 1910. Shipler took this photograph shortly before the D&RG moved to its new passenger depot. This property on 200 South between 600 and 700 West is currently being considered as the site for an intermodal transportation hub. (Neg. 10939.)