Seeing Salt Lake City
by Alan Barnett

Smith Drug Store Corner
[p.71] Smith Drug Store Corner at 200 South and Main Street, August 26, 1910. About a year after Shipler took this photograph, the building, with its myriad billboards, was razed for construction of the new high-rise Walker Bank Building. (Neg. 10976.)

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Salt Palace
[p.72] The Salt Palace (date unknown). This structure, designed by Richard Kletting as the centerpiece of an amusement park on 900 South between State and Main streets, was constructed in 1899 and derived its name from the fact that the wood structure was covered with salt crystals. The Palace served as an exhibition hall, theater, and dance hall, and was lit up at night by some 900 electric lights. (Unnumbered negative.)

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Salt Palace
[p.73] The charred remains of the Salt Palace, August 29, 1910. Shipler took this photograph the morning after a fire destroyed the main pavilion, a number of concession stands, and part of the bicycle racetrack. Although the Salt Palace itself was never rebuilt, the amusement park remained in operation for a number of years, first under the Salt Palace name and later as Majestic Park. Today automobile dealerships and a hotel occupy the site. The only part of the Salt Palace to survive was its name, which was later used for Salt Lake City’s sports arena and then for the convention center that replaced it. (Neg. 10984.)

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LDS Granite Stake Tabernacle
[p.74] The LDS Granite Stake Tabernacle, October 13, 1910. This imposing structure stood on the northeast corner of 3300 South and State Street. Built to serve members of the LDS church’s Granite Stake, it was renamed the Granite Stake Tabernacle after the Granite Stake built a new building on 900 East in Sugarhouse. After this structure was demolished in 1956, Prudential Federal Savings built a branch on the site. Today a movie theater complex occupies this location. (Neg. 11161.)

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Valley House
[p.75] The Valley House, October 26, 1910. The section of the building to the left was built as a residence by Wilford Woodruff in 1815; the section on the right was added about 1873 to create a hotel. The Valley House touted itself as the city’s only non-alcoholic hotel. It outlasted many other hotels in town, but when this photograph was taken, it was nearing its end. The Valley House ceased functioning about 1913 and was demolished in 1915. This site on the corner of West Temple and South Temple is now occupied by the Abravanel Hall plaza. (Neg. 11204.)

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Union Station
[p.76] Union Station, November 9, 1910. This view shows the depot about the time of its completion. The building originally served as the depot for the Oregon Short Line Railroad and the San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad, both subsidiaries of Union Pacific. (Neg. 11257B.)

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Deseret Gym.
[p.77] The newly completed Deseret Gymnasium, November 14, 1910. This photograph was taken from the yard of the Lion House where the LDS church would later build its Administration Building on South Temple between State and Main streets. The church built this facility to provide recreational facilities for young people and a gymnasium for LDS University. Note the panel with the letters “DG” and the bas relief sculptures depicting various athletic activities. This building was demolished in 1962 to make way for the church office tower and plaza, but the name of the building was carried on by a new building at 200 North and Main streets. (Neg. 11270.)

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Ivanhoe Apts.
[p.78] Moving a piano at the Ivanhoe Apartments, January 5, 1911. These movers were employed by the Willey Transfer Company, one of a number of such companies operating in Salt Lake City at the time. The Ivanhoe Apartments still stand on 300 South between 400 and 500 East streets. (Neg. 11425.)

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State Capitol Grounds
[p.79] The State Capitol Grounds, February 22, 1911. This photograph was taken looking southwest from Capitol Hill. The property in the foreground was given to the Territory of Utah by Salt Lake City in 1888 for the construction of a capitol building. By the time ground was finally broken in 1912, the property had been known for many years as the “Capitol Grounds” and had served as a public park. Buildings visible in the background include the Union Pacific Depot, the Salt Lake Hardware Building, and the Salt Lake High School (now West High). (Neg. 11565.)

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18th Ward Wall
[p.80] The 18th Ward Wall, April 20, 1911. This portion of the stone wall that surrounded Brigham Young’s property survived for many years along the west side of A Street between 1st and 2nd avenues. (Neg. 11793.)