The New Mormon History
D. Michael Quinn, editor

Chapter 17
Contributors

Thomas G. Alexander is professor of history at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He is director of the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, past president of the Mormon History Association, author of Mormonism in Transition: A History of the Latter-day Saints, 1890-1930, and co-author of Mormons & Gentiles: A History of Salt Lake City. “‘To Maintain Harmony’: Adjusting to External and Internal Stress, 1890-1930” was first published in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 15 (Winter 1982): 44-58.

James B. Allen, former Assistant Church Historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is Lemuel Redd Professor of Western History at Brigham Young University. He is past president of the Mormon History Association, author of Trials of Discipleship: The Story of William Clayton, a Mormon and co-author of The Story of the Latter-day Saints. The “Significance of Joseph Smith’s ‘First Vision’ in Mormon Thought,” 1 (Autumn 1966): 29-45.

Leonard J. Arrington was Church Historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for ten years beginning in 1972. He is past director of the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Church History at Brigham Young University and was the first president of the Mormon History Association, which he helped to found. He is author of Great Basin Kingdom: An Economic History of the Latter-day Saints, 1830-1900 and Brigham Young: American Moses. “The Search for Truth and Meaning in Mormon History was first published in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 3 (Summer 1968): 56-66, and subsequently anthologized in Personal Voices: A Celebration of Dialogue, ed. Mary L. Bradford (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1987), 63-77.

Maureen Ursenbach Beecher is professor of English and senior research historian for the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Church History. She was founding president of the Association of Mormon Letters and is past president of the Mormon History Association. “‘The Leading Sisters’: A Female Hierarchy in Nineteenth-century Mormon Society” first appeared in Journal of Mormon History 9 (1982): 25-39.

Eugene E. Campbell was professor of history at Brigham Young University and is past president of the Mormon History Association. The author of Establishing Zion: The Mormon Church in the American West, 1847-69, he died in 1986. Bruce L. Campbell, his son, is associate professor of family studies and consumer sciences at California State University at Los Angeles. “Divorce among Mormon Polygamists: Extent and Explanations” was first published in the Utah Historical Quarterly 46 (Winter 1978): 4-23.

Kenneth L. Cannon is a lawyer practicing in Salt Lake City, Utah. He serves on the Advisory Board of Editors of the Utah Historical Quarterly and on the board of trustees of the Utah Heritage Foundation. He received the Mormon History Association’s Francis M. Chipman Award to Outstanding Young Scholar in 1983. “After the Manifesto: Mormon Polygamy, 1890-1906” is a revision of his essay first appearing in Sunstone 8 (Jan.-Apr. 1983: 27-35).

Mario S. DePillis is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He has been trustee and historical consultant for the restoration of the Shaker community of Hancock, Massachusetts. “The Quest for Religious Authority and the Rise of Mormonism” first appeared in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 1 (Autumn 1966): 68-88.

Robert B. Flanders, professor of history at Southwest Missouri University in Springfield, is author of Nauvoo: Kingdom on the Mississippi. “Dream and Nightmare: Nauvoo Revisited” was first published in The Restoration Movement: Essays on Mormon History, eds. F. Mark McKiernan, Alma R. Blair, and Paul M. Edwards (Lawrence, KS: Coronado Press, 1973), 141-66.

Klaus J. Hansen is professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He is author of Quest for Empire: The Political Kingdom of God and the Council of Fifty in Mormon History and Mormonism and the American Experience. “The Metamorphosis of the Kingdom of God: Toward a Reinterpretation of Mormon History” first appeared in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 1 (Autumn 1966): 63-83.

William G. Hartley is associate professor of history and research historian for the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Church History at Brigham Young University. “Mormons, Crickets, and Gulls:  A New Look at an Old Story,” first appeared in Utah Historical Quarterly 38 (Summer 1970): 224-39.

Stanley S. Ivins taught animal husbandry at the University of Nebraska. He died in 1967. “Notes on Mormon Polygamy” was first published in Western Humanities Review 10 (Summer 1956), 3:229-39, then in Utah Historical Quarterly 35 (Fall 1967): 309-21, and later anthologized in Mormonism and American Culture, eds. Marvin S. Hill and James B. Allen (New York: Harper & Row, 1972), 101-11.

Dean L. May, former editor of Journal of Mormon History is associate professor of history at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. “A Demographic Portrait of the Mormons, 1830-1980” was first published in After 150 Years: The Latter-day Saints in Sesquicentennial Perspective, eds. Thomas G. Alexander and Jessie L. Embry (Provo, UT: Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, 1983), 37-69.

Linda King Newell, former co-editor of Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, is co-author of Mormon Enigma: Emma Hale Smith. “A Gift Given, A Gift Taken: Washing, Anointing, and Blessing the Sick among Mormon Women” first appeared in Sunstone 6 (Sept.-Oct. 1981): 16-25, and was subsequently anthologized as “Gifts of the Spirit: Women’s Share” in Sisters in Spirit: Mormon Women in Historical and Cultural Perspective, eds. Maureen Ursenbach Beecher and Lavina Fielding Anderson (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1987), 111-50.

B. H. Roberts was a General Authority of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1888 until his death in 1933. He was author of New Witness for God and other works. He served as Assistant Church Historian from 1902 to 1933. “Justice Will Follow Truth” is excerpted from A Comprehensive History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Century I, 6 vols. (Salt Lake City: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1930), 1:vii-ix.

Jan Shipps is professor of history and religious studies at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. She is past president of the Mormon History Association, author of Mormonism: The Story of a New Religious Tradition, and currently co-editor of Religion and American Culture: A Journal of Interpretation. “The Prophet Puzzle: Suggestions Leading Toward a More Comprehensive Interpretation of Joseph Smith” was first published in Journal of Mormon History 1 (1974): 3-20.

Ronald W. Walker is professor of history and senior research historian for the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Church History at Brigham Young University. “Sheaves, Bucklers, and the State: Mormon Leaders Respond to the Dilemmas of War” first appeared in Sunstone 7 (July-Aug. 1982): 43-56.